RSS feed for Anton

Favorite films

Recent activity

All films

Recent reviews

More
  • Northwest 2013

    Added

    Reviewed for Film4 www.film4.com/reviews/2013/northwest

    Synopsis: From the co-director of R (2010) and the producers of A Hijacking (2012) comes this social realist gangster drama set on the mean streets of a Copenhagen district.

    Review: In Nordvest, a multicultural working class district of Copenhagen, 18-year-old skinhead Casper (Gustav Dyekjær Giese) is a mass of conflicts and contradictions. In the absence of his own father, he tries to be a protective, paternal influence on his brother Andy (Dyekjær Giese's real-life brother Oscar)…

  • How to Train Your Dragon 2 2014

    Added

    Reviewed for Film4 www.film4.com/reviews/2014/how-to-train-your-dragon-2

    Synopsis: Dean DeBlois, co-writer and co-director of How To Train Your Dragon, flies solo with this more adult animated Viking adventure sequel.

    Review: In the five years since the events of How To Train Your Dragon (2010), the island village of Berk has become a peaceful haven where Vikings and dragons live in harmony, bothering nobody but the sheep that they use as balls in Quidditch-like competitions.

    Young Hiccup (voiced again by Jay Baruchel) has won…

Popular reviews

More
  • Nymphomaniac 2013

    Added 2

    review from Film4 (slightly altered)
    www.film4.com/reviews/2013/nymphomaniac

    Descriptive synopsis: Controversial Danish filmmaker Lars von Trier rounds off his 'Trilogy of Depression' with a tale (in two parts) of sexual liberation, oppression and exploitation.

    Review:
    "Fill all my holes, please."
    It is perhaps not as catchy as the line "Chaos reigns" from Lars von Trier's Antichrist (2009), the first film of the so-called 'Trilogy of Depression' (which Nymphomaniac closes) - but nonetheless it is a line repeated several times by the heroine…

  • Starred Up 2013

    Added

    Review for EyeforFilm eyeforfilm.co.uk/review/starred-up-2013-film-review-by-anton-bitel

    Starred Up is a story of fathers and sons, of violence and control, of pent-up emotions and revolving doors, of self-perpetuating problems and unwanted (if certainly effective) solutions. In other words, it is a film about masculinity and society, which just happens to be set in the closed system of a prison. That said, its allegorical underpinnings are offset by a pervasive realism: for it is the first screenplay by Jonathan Asser, who has spent 12…