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  • The Look of Silence 2014

    ★★★★½ Watched 19 Sep, 2014

    astonishing.

    Oppenheimer's THE ACT OF KILLING follow-up uses a blunter, equally brilliant conceptual approach for a more sedate and unsettling portrait of the Indonesian genocide and the rampant denial that has allowed the perpetrators to survive. the film doesn't get too caught up in the time-honored literary tradition of the revelatory optometrist, it's just one of the many tools Oppenheimer uses to mediate the memories... if the first film was predicated on a sensationalist feeling of HOLY SHIT, LOOK AT…

  • The Maze Runner 2014

    ★★½ Watched 19 Sep, 2014

    When it comes to the recent rash of YA adaptations, The Maze Runner is a singularly frustrating experience. It doesn’t just squander its abundant potential to break away from the stagnant tropes that have calcified its genre, it ultimately reveals that it had never had any hope or intention of doing otherwise. If The Maze Runner begins as an urgent and refreshingly focused addition to the canon of dystopian teen survival stories, it ends by exemplifying the worst of its kind (in part because it doesn’t really end at all).

    FULL REVIEW ON COMPLEX: www.complex.com/pop-culture/2014/09/the-maze-runner-movie-review

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  • Godzilla 2014

    ★★★★½ Added 18

    GODZILLA is the TRUTH.

    one of the most satisfying, well-paced & beautifully directed blockbusters since Jurassic Park. a genuine spectacle of humility. Many complaining that the film abandons interest in its characters, but the perils of human egocentrism in the face of global crisis = the entire point. genuinely registers as the first post-human blockbuster. i almost feel like people have been conditioned to the explosive banality of contemporary tentpoles... but if any $200 million monster movie is going to feel…

  • The Grand Budapest Hotel 2014

    ★★★★½ Watched 03 Feb, 2014 8

    The Grand Budapest Hotel is the film with which Wes Anderson finally answers his critics, and the message could not be clearer or more immaculately embossed in Futura on an insert shot of the most delicate stationary: “Go fuck yourselves.” Anderson has been contemporary American cinema’s most hostile aesthete for well over a decade, and ever since 2003’s The Life Aquatic made it obvious that the filmmaker has exactly zero interest in apologizing for his affectations, each of his subsequent…