• JohnAllegretti

    Added by JohnAllegretti

    Blu-Ray

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  • A.C. Neel

    ★★★★ Watched by A.C. Neel 20 Apr, 2015

    About a group of nuns that try to establish a convent in the Himalayas, this is a haunting film that raises a myriad of interesting questions about faith, cultural imperialism, and the tensions between asceticism and sensuality. Strikingly filmed and well-acted, if a bit stodgy at times.

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  • S_MTX

    ★★★½ Rewatched by S_MTX 15 Apr, 2015

    Very beautiful looking film. An impressive technical accomplishment. Has great atmosphere but is very cold and soulless. There are no bad performances here. I just don't think the material is strong enough. It ends up going in a weird direction. I get the main point but the execution just makes its ideas of sexual repression seem kind of goofy. Not my personal favorite from Powell & Pressburger but it is a unique beast for sure.

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  • Evan

    ★★★★ Watched by Evan 10 Apr, 2015

    You’d think this would be a dreary feel-good movie for the missionary set, but in fact Black Narcissus is eerie and erotic melodrama, that, by the climax, starts flirting with horror as Sister Ruth goes mad for sex and freedom, dashing red hues across the Himalayas.

    Powell thought of this as his most erotic movie, and boy, is it erotic. There’s something almost haunting about the wordless submissive-dominant flirtations between Kanchi (Jean Simmons) and the Young General (Sabu). Simmons is,…

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  • Chaz_420

    ★★★★★ Added by Chaz_420

    guess how much work I got done today...................Nun.

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  • Chris Hormann

    ★★★★½ Watched by Chris Hormann 04 Apr, 2015

    An astonishingly beautiful Technicolor production, from the legendary team of Powell & Pressburger, soaked in repressed eroticism and tested faith.

    A wonderful cast is led by Deborah Kerr as the Sister Superior of the convent outpost who slowly loses control of her charges and her own faith. However she is outshone by Kathleen Byron as Sister Ruth, who begins the film as the most fragile of the order and descends from there. Her final scenes are terrifying and she completely sells…

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  • martin martin kochany

    ★★★★★ Added by martin martin kochany

    So erotic intense and suppressed

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  • Sky

    ★★★★★ Watched by Sky 30 Mar, 2015

    The last twenty minutes are amazing and so beautifully shot (as were the other eighty).

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  • Dave Bastian

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Dave Bastian 15 Mar, 2006

    Five nuns lose their faith—and their minds—in a remote Himalayan samaritan outpost. This is the Mother Superior of the nun genre—a beautiful, terrifying, hot-blooded melodrama that begins with a whisper and goes out with a scream. Stunning technicolor photography by Jack Cardiff and art direction by Alfred Junge, both of whom won Oscars. One of the most chilling portraits of madness ever committed to film.

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  • george the beast

    ★★★★★ Watched by george the beast 20 Mar, 2015

    it's one of those films that they have to play it on theatres at least 5 times a year cause the cinematography IS BLOODY BRILLIANT!!!
    watch it at least on a 40 inch tv , it will make you breathless from some scenes!
    WATCH IT!!!

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  • Mart Raun

    ★★★★½ Watched by Mart Raun 20 Mar, 2015

    Watching "Black Narcissus" for the first time I must concur that this is indeed one of the most beautiful films ever made. Shot by the master of technicolor - Jack Cardiff, it really is a work of art.

    This film is like a great painting with a wonderful use of color, composition and mood, with a real sense of place and time. Although it was mostly shot on set, it doesn't feel like it. I actually couldn't believe it was…

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  • Xebeche

    ★★★★½ Rewatched by Xebeche 19 Mar, 2015

    Black Narcissus is so very sensual and so very sensory.

    A gaggle of nuns are assigned to turn a Himalayan castle into a school/hospital for the locals. Each woman's fortitude of faith is threatened by the presence of promiscuous teenagers, roguish Englishmen, or the never ending winds. As usual, Powell and Pressburger use broad strokes. They paint an exotic, luscious world that our characters are forbidden to enjoy. The style of the Archers perfectly exaggerates the temptations of life as…

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