• thepissoff

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by thepissoff 24 Jul, 2014

    you can take your mountain movie and shove it Leni Riefenstahl

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  • Shaun Brown

    ★★★★★ Added by Shaun Brown 1

    This review reportedly contains spoilers. I can handle the truth.

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  • BruceWayne14

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by BruceWayne14 30 May, 2014

    The climax of this film has to be the most perfectly directed sequence I have ever seen.

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  • Gala Avary

    ★★★★★ Watched by Gala Avary 22 May, 2014 4

    Such a beautiful film, especially when viewed on criterion blu-ray...

    I love the symbolism in this film and the fact that it was all filmed in London ... all of the matte paintings are beautiful and you really feel like you're up there with the nuns. I'm not sure if it was my air conditioning, but whenever the wind blew through I felt a chill...

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  • Jordan Horowitz

    ★★★★★ Watched by Jordan Horowitz 17 May, 2014

    Better every time I see it. The language really stuck with me, this time -- so much emotional intelligence.

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  • Goodwin

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Goodwin 28 Apr, 2014

    Visually stupendous tale of erotic longing and hysteria. Does not quite hit on all notes as do the very best of Powell and Pressburger, but what it does is hard to believe. It seems impossible this film was shot where it was shot. As a feat of filmmaking it is unparalleled.

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  • Anny

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Anny 22 Apr, 2014

    Nothing is sexier than a handyman riding a foal.

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  • Goodwin

    ★★★★★ Watched by Goodwin 16 Apr, 2014

    Visually stupendous tale of erotic longing and hysteria. Does not hit on all notes as do the very best of Powell and Pressburger, but what it does is hard to believe. It seems impossible this film was shot where it was shot. As a feat of filmmaking it is unparalleled.

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  • Eric

    ★★★★★ Watched by Eric 02 Apr, 2009

    In the 1940s, the British filmmaking duo of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger completed a series of masterpieces in what was their most prolific decade. Although A Matter of Life and Death can more accurately be described as the first film in which Powell, Pressburger, and cinematographer Jack Cardiff utilized color as a means of expressing the interior emotions of a character, perhaps no singular effort is more emblematic of their collective talents than Black Narcissus. As a film very…

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  • Raúl Cornejo

    ★★★★★ Watched by Raúl Cornejo 18 Mar, 2014

    Deborah Kerr / Kathleen Bryon / Jean Simmons, viento y Jack Cardiff

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  • Kurosawa

    ★★★★★ Watched by Kurosawa 11 Mar, 2014

    I had never watched this before and sitting down to watch a film about a convent of nuns in India was not what I had in mind for this evening. But in the end, 1947's "Black Narcissus" will be the film that sets me off on a Powell/Pressburger viewing spree. It will also become my new high mark for cinematography - ha! new? it's from 1947!!
    Jack Cardiff's Technicolor cinematography and Alfred Junge's design make every frame absolutely exquisite.
    And…

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  • SJHoneywell

    ★★★★★ Added by SJHoneywell

    When Sister Ruth goes
    Mad, she brings the crazy with
    Bells and tin whistles!

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