• Quizrama

    Watched by Quizrama 22 May, 2015

    Summing up mankind through images that move either too quickly or too slowly, but rarely at a normal speed, this cinematic triumph is simply a feast for the eyes! Thank goodness people have learned to walk at a reasonable pace since 1982!

    View

  • Alex Valdés

    ★★★★★ Watched by Alex Valdés 17 May, 2015

    This movie is so cool. It strips you of your self-awareness and forces you to observe humanity from the perspective of an outsider. It's like a human zoo. It tells a kind of crescendoing story about colonization with only its hypnotic music and visuals and entirely without dialogue.

    View

  • Isa

    Added by Isa

    no words.

    View

  • Tom Morton

    ★★★★½ Watched by Tom Morton 14 May, 2015

    I spent the entire day cooped up in a windowless room learning about Microsoft Azure technologies while terrible music played in the background. When picking a film for the evening, I wanted to find the exact opposite of that experience, and I think, in Koyaanisqatsi, I made the perfect choice.

    View

  • •antivist•

    ★★★★ Watched by •antivist• 12 Oct, 2014

    Completely taken by it every time. Godfrey Reggio's unflinching look at mans effect on the world told through some of the most breathtaking images one could imagine aided by Philip Glass's incredible score is one of the most impressive documentaries ever made.

    View

  • Concertina

    ★★½ Watched by Concertina 06 May, 2015

    Me encantó y odié el soundtrack. Soy mujer.

    View

  • petrilloz

    ★★★★★ Added by petrilloz

    Even if you’ve never sat down to watch Koyaanisqatsi, chances are you’ve seen its images. Perhaps not literally, but the this early-80s film has managed to influence everything from music videos and computer commercials to CGI-driven blockbusters. Koyaanisqatsi was conceived as a collaboration between first time director Godfrey Reggio, cinematographer Ron Fricke, and composer Philip Glass.

    Ostensibly it’s a montage of the world that takes the viewer from the beginnings of nature to the restlessness of modern existence. Though beyond…

    View

  • Graham J

    ★★★★½ Watched by Graham J 02 May, 2015

    A collection of images at varying speeds - some intriguing, some fascinating, some poetic and some just outright beautiful. Earth and the human experience (mostly a cynics view) presented against the incredible and propulsive music of Philip Glass.

    This is a unique experience.

    View

  • Dreception

    ★★★★½ Watched by Dreception 29 Apr, 2015 5

    A poetic, beautiful, and gorgeous visual ride that stimulates all senses and emotions. Images of the world we live in and the humans that inhabit it are cleverly juxtaposed and contextualized to surface questions about the nature of human existence over time. A very interesting message that is more or less conveyed.
    All this is accompanied by nothing short of a majestic score from Philip Glass. And..... I will admit I began to cry about 2/3s through the movie. The…

    View

  • DanStew

    ★★★★ Watched by DanStew 22 Apr, 2015

    Really beautiful images paired with a powerful Philip Glass score. So powerful, that Hans Zimmer totally ripped it off for Interstellar.

    View

  • BoringPostcards

    ★★★★½ Rewatched by BoringPostcards 21 Apr, 2015

    I saw this movie (when it first came out) when I was in high school, and besides the fact that it introduced me (and everybody else) to Philip Glass, I feel like it permanently affected the way I see the world. We should show it to children in preschool. It was one of the first films to show the planet at a macro scale, with life and time sped up to the point that we could see their ebb and…

    View

  • Reece Leonard

    ★★★★½ Watched by Reece Leonard 20 Apr, 2015

    Boasting gorgeous visuals that are cleverly juxtaposed and contextualized to posit questions about the nature of human existence over time and an otherworldly score from Philip Glass, "Koyaanisquatsi" is a masterfully constructed and brilliantly original piece of work offering visually poetic insights into the human condition that both thrill and perplex.

    View