• Doug Heller

    ★★★★★ Watched by Doug Heller 26 Jul, 2015

    This is quite honestly one of the most amazing things I've ever seen. I thought I'd just watch some of it, thinking it would be kind of boring considering it's non-narrative and dialogue free, but it just grabbed me. It was involving, fast-moving and beautiful. The emotional impact of this film is unequaled and stunning. Not to be missed if you can get your hands on it.

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  • Adam Cloutier

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Adam Cloutier 25 Jul, 2015

    Maybe the most affecting film of all time(s). I stand by my previous review (simply the sentence "Frankly, this is why film was made.") and I'll also add that this is the greatest manipulation of time that I have witnessed. Maybe I will have more to say at some point later but it can only be read once the film has been seen as it is truly unable to be communicated in a form other than itself. 10/10/10/10.

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  • Ben

    ★★★★★ Watched by Ben 17 Jul, 2015

    100% spectacle from beginning to end with a ominous bite to it, reaches heights of both meditative trance and frenetic hyperactivity with grace and finesse, and relates an easily understood message despite the complete lack of narration or conventional plot.

    It's clear just by watching the film that months of work had been put into the project - the cinematography and editing are perfect, and I would often wonder how specific shots were achieved. However, what really makes Koyaanisqatsi work…

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  • tttaub

    ★★★★★ Watched by tttaub 17 Jul, 2015

    Yes. Most definitely.

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  • Omar Madhar

    ★★★★★ Watched by Omar Madhar 15 Jul, 2015

    I can't imagine how audiences would've reacted to this back in '82, I'm sure it definitely kept people wondering "how'd they film this on top of that summit???" "why is that camera so far up in the clouds?" "is this even legal???" and so on. It's perfectly reasonable why the general audience would ask these questions. This film was ahead of it's fucking time. The musical score fits perfectly and is far and away one of the best i've heard…

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  • Nicole R.

    Watched by Nicole R. 06 Jul, 2015

    This film is almost impossible to rate or judge by any ordinary standard. To me, it seemed like an exercise in testing the limits of cinema as a vehicle for storytelling. It does have narrative structure-- it can be cleaved fairly neatly into several acts, and there is something of a climax-- but without dialogue, and only incidental, observed human interaction, it leaves itself almost wholly open to the interpretation of the viewer. Which is maybe the point? Some of…

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  • Nathan Smith

    Watched by Nathan Smith 12 Jul, 2015 1

    i know this movie is supposed to make me feel bad about impending natural disaster or something but damn do some of these sequences make me feel proud to be a human

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  • Madison Bounds

    ★★★★★ Watched by Madison Bounds 12 Jul, 2015

    I cannot sleep. I cannot eat. I cannot think. I cannot act. The affect and weight of this film is unbearable. I lay in bed, slowly thawing out.

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  • Dominic Cobb

    ★★★½ Watched by Dominic Cobb 10 Jul, 2015

    Koyaanisqatsi, meaning, "life out of balance" seems to be a suitable title for the message that director Godfrey Reggio intended to get across in this film, which from what I understood, was that humans should give as much as we take.

    Of course that message isn't given clearly, and I'm not entirely certain that was the basis of the message. Perhaps it was something like, don't take at all, or something like that. Without a clear narrator it's hard to…

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  • Eric Cloutier

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Eric Cloutier 01 Jul, 2015

    HOW CAN I EVEN TAKE THIS MUCH PAIN AGHHHHHHHHHH

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  • Andreas Schmid

    Watched by Andreas Schmid 12 Jun, 2015

    ___________________________________________________________________
    Film #4 of my Scavenger Hunt #3 Challenge
    Task #15: An avant-garde film
    letterboxd.com/grany/list/scavenger-hunt-3/
    ___________________________________________________________________

    Does dialogue-free visual poetry sound avant-garde enough for you? I had always wondered whether any film would follow in the footsteps of Dziga Vertovs “Man With A Movie Camera” in trying to use image composition as the sole way of telling a story. It took about half a century, but here we are. Of course times are different now, and some of the footage,…

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  • Adam Cloutier

    ★★★★★ Watched by Adam Cloutier 30 Jun, 2015

    Frankly, this is why film was made. 10/10.

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