• Matthew H

    ★★★★ Rewatched by Matthew H 01 May, 2015

    I hadn't watched this movie in well over 20 years. It is strange how only a few scenes stuck in my head...the dwarf peeing in the fountain, the door knockers and the creatures who could take their heads off. I am surprised I didn't remember the helping hands as they were one of the more creative creatures in the entire movie.

    Labyrinth is definitely a kids movie but is pretty dark and I could see where it may scare some…

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  • elsawj

    ★★★★★ Added by elsawj

    ...

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  • tripleholmes

    ★★★½ Added by tripleholmes 2

    It's been a long time since I last remebered seeing this film, but it was a fell brilliant movie. So many puppetry, really amazing, and excellent songs, very catchy.
    David Bowie looked devilish as the villain(or anti-hero, as he shows to be in love with the girl). Although I wasn't sure about the tight pants he was wearing, it was like his crotch was gone! LOL

    But I did liked the performance though, the musical moments, the puppetry perfomance, and…

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  • Keeker

    ★★ Watched by Keeker 26 Apr, 2015

    If you didn't watch this in the 80s, don't watch it now. It has aged woefully. The only possible pleasure you can get out of this is if a/ you're nostalgic for your lost youth or b/ you like terrible 80s movies

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  • Robyn

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Robyn 26 Apr, 2015

    i cant write a review about this because it might make @lottipop angry and she knows where i live

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  • J. J. Wright

    ★★★ Rewatched by J. J. Wright 24 Apr, 2015

    Hadn't seen this since I was a kid, and the only thing I remember from that viewing was the Bog of Eternal Stench, so... it's not like I have a ton of residual goodwill or nostalgia. Unfortunately.

    The thing is, the visual design and puppetry is outstanding. Almost enough to make up for the copious flaws with the story and script. There is an elemental quality to the film's themes, its fantasy elements of a mystical, dangerous place JUST around…

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  • Kayo Jolongbayan

    ★★★★½ Added by Kayo Jolongbayan

    Labyrinth (1986) - A classic fairy tale; as a Children's film, an excellent depiction of character development and maturity. As a gay film, a perfect coming out film. Camptastically alluring.

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  • Daniel Lackey

    ★★★ Rewatched by Daniel Lackey 18 Apr, 2015

    I know I'm gonna get lynched for this, because Labyrinth is one of the most beloved of the '80s young-adult fantasy/science fiction/adventure classics, but...

    By and large it does not resonate with me. It's a fairy tale and a coming-of-age story, and I'm not much into either genre. David Bowie does fine with the stilted fairy-tale dialog, but Jennifer Connelly consistently comes off like she's reading her lines from a storybook. The constant attention Bowie's costume draws to his package…

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  • Terri

    ★★½ Watched by Terri 19 Apr, 2015

    So very 80s. Honestly, it's a bit long and slow, but it has some fun moments, and anything that comes from Jim Henson, and owes this much to Alice in Wonderland/Through the Looking Glass, and features David Bowie (even if he is being quite dorky) has to have its finer points. The--ahem--acting leaves much to be desired. But the trippy bits and the somewhat Phantom of the Opera-esque scene are fun in an 80s indulgence kind of way.

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  • ortolanph

    ★★★★ Watched by ortolanph 19 Apr, 2015

    This movie is about wishes that can be dangerous. We need to take care of what we desire and face the consequences about our wishes. In this case a wish has been made by our protagonist and she had to face a lot of singing of David Bowie to rescue a baby on the Escher's stairs in a castle after the goblins' city after a dangerous and bizarre labyrinth. This is what happens when you join George Lucas, Terry Jones…

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  • Jake Mulligan

    ★★★½ Rewatched by Jake Mulligan 01 Apr, 2015

    Henson reaches the same conclusion as hundreds of other kids films before and since: the characters Sarah met throughout her journey return to her and dance by her side. But their existence sprung from Sarah’s mind, and her mind sprang from books, novels, movies, and paintings (all seen in the film's first bravura tracking shot.) The dance becomes a literal representation of how living with an artwork—not just enjoying it, but thinking about it, analyzing it, and in some cases, dreaming it—serves as an integral part of one’s identity.

    Wrote a bit about my reading of the film for the Brattle Theatre's Film Notes.

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  • drfulci

    ★★★½ Rewatched by drfulci 18 Apr, 2015

    Such an amazing film and one that I never grow tired of seeing.

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