• Scott Davis

    Watched by Scott Davis 05 Mar, 2014

    Criterion describes this as an experimental film. That's pretty apt, since Brian De Palma uses this film to experiment with nontraditional techniques both in storytelling and direction. Woe to the 42nd Street raincoater who went into the theatre expecting cheap thrills of the David Friedman variety and got this kooky and surprisingly non-explicit work instead. I wish I could say it's a complete success, but the film is often a disjointed mess. It screams of someone trying stuff out, without…

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  • Christian Ortega

    ★★★½ Watched by Christian Ortega 14 Jan, 2014

    Being the first De Palma feature it's pretty well done. Although not as masterfully done as Nolan's Following, it reminded me of that film a lot. Maybe because of it's noir style. This is a pretty good film and if you can make it pass the first twenty minutes or so, which are dull as hell, you're certainly in for a thrill.

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  • Horcruxnelius Doubleboss

    ★★★½ Watched by Horcruxnelius Doubleboss 03 Jan, 2014

    strange

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  • Lee Howard

    ★★★ Watched by Lee Howard 29 Sep, 2013

    The Count's Verdict: I was quite taken aback at just how many of the themes and motifs which would go on to define De Palma's career are already fully present in his 'lost' first feature. Voyeuristic use of technology and POV shots, scantily-clad women and murder, non-linear narrative structure and multiple protagonists, experimental camera techniques and a playful, self-reflexive tone, it is all here. In fact, De Palma's debut film is actually so energetically cine-literate and experimental (even featuring a…

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  • sweaternine

    ★★½ Watched by sweaternine 05 Jun, 2013

    BLACK DAHLIA came out 40 years after MURDER A LA MOD and has the same shot in it -- black-and-white audition, half-dressed actress playing an actress, directly addressing the viewfinder, with De Palma's own voice giving offscreen direction. It's those wormholes that keep you watching this debut feature, specifically how even then De Palma works to curdle exploitation. As a thriller, it doesn't hold up under the weight of self-referentiality (a charge I wouldn't levy against his later thrillers), although it gets away with Finley's silent comedy to a much greater degree than I expected. Only of interest to De Palma fans, but: of interest.

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  • Derek Godin

    ★★★ Watched by Derek Godin 23 May, 2013

    Another strange piece of auteur juvenalia, this one giving the viewer an unfiltered view into what made Brian De Plama tick in the late sixties. All of the working parts of a De Palma film are present and accounted for; a little Hitchcock, a little Powell/Pressburger, and a whole lot of camera tricks. What this movie doesn't have, as a lot of first films do, is an editing job worth a lick. This would be a great sleaze-o B-thriller if…

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  • matt lynch

    ★★★ Watched by matt lynch 26 May, 2013

    this is definitely Brian De Palma's first feature.

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  • Benjamin Plymin

    ★★★★ Watched by Benjamin Plymin 10 Apr, 2013

    ‘Murder A La Mod’ is a perfect example of how influential De Palma is on Tarantino’s work. Sporting a non-linear plot structure to slowly unravel the story’s mystery this experiential film is De Palma’s debut feature film. With its very own theme song this movie explores the connection with female sexuality and violence (pretty bold for 1967!) In a way it’s a reinvention of one of the first slasher films ‘Peeping Tom’ with the main murder tool being a sharp…

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  • bmart17

    ★½ Added by bmart17

    There's a story somewhere in this film, but it will be awhile before you find it. It's pretty old and experimental though. If you have a really odd taste in low-budget psychotic thriller movies then this is perfect for you. Otherwise you can just avoid it.

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  • ryknight

    Watched by ryknight 13 Jan, 2013

    Rashoman meets Peeping Tom is the most 1967 high concept studio pitch there never was.

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  • Paul Corupe

    ★★★ Watched by Paul Corupe 15 Nov, 2008 1

    DePalma’s first movie is an ambitious murder story that jumps around between viewpoints and times to tell the story of a woman who is killed by her film director boyfriend. It retains that sleazy 42nd street edge despite aiming higher than most exploitation features. It’s main problem is one of tone, specifically the “humorous” character of Otto who muddles several of the film’s attempts at suspense.

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