• PatrickRipoll

    ★★★½ Added by PatrickRipoll

    As far as the dual two-strip Michael Curtiz horror films starring clay-faced ghouls go, this feels like The 39 Steps to Doctor X's Man Who Knew Too Much. Streamlined, faster paced, and with an emphasis on banter. However, the chief appeal of Doctor X for me was it's ragged grotesqueries and perverse premise being amplified by the compelling two-strip Technicolor aesthetic, and it's tendency to make the entire universe bruised and rotting. With a more straight-forward and compelling mystery story,…


  • Matthew Rice

    ★★★★ Watched by Matthew Rice 05 Nov, 2015

    Fun and goofy with a couple of spooky moments. It's appeal comes mainly from the spirited female journalist who takes it upon herself to investigate to strange going-ons at the wax music. That girls got a lot of spunk and moxy (to use the language of the day) and it's nice to see a strong, funny female lead for a change in an old movie.

    The ending is so bizarre and out of context with the rest of the film…


  • neilgrahamuk

    ★★½ Watched by neilgrahamuk 24 Oct, 2015 5

    The Mystery of the Wax Museum is an interesting curio. Directed by Michael Curtiz, it seems influenced by well everything. There is the horror of Universal – the shadows, pathetic fallacy and great laboratories. There is German Expressionism in the underground wax cellar – all stylised lines and angles. There is The Front Page style investigation; the rat-a-tat of fast paced newspaper talk; and there is the edgy Warner social background – the influence of drug addicts and alcohol. It…



    ★★★ Watched by STEPHEN TUBBS 25 Oct, 2015

    According to Maltin this was a long lost film. The early Technicolor is interesting. Has both suspense and comedic moments.


  • Zack Clopton

    ★★★ Added by Zack Clopton

    This review reportedly contains spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Wax dummies are creepy. They saunter right into the uncanny valley, even more-so then ventriloquist dummies or dolls. Those objects usually exaggerate the human form. Wax mannequins, meanwhile, mean to duplicate it perfectly. This makes them creepy as fuck. So it’s no shock that numerous horror films have meant to capitalize on that creepiness. “House of Wax” is obviously the most well-known example but that film is actually a remake of an even earlier film. “Mystery of the Wax Museum”…


  • Ryan Sarnowski

    Watched by Ryan Sarnowski 14 Oct, 2015 3

    In the 1933 film "The Mysteries of the Wax Museum" one of the two main female characters is a plucky investigative journalist who gets to the bottom of the nefarious wax artist's misdeeds. When the same story was remade in 1955 as "House of Wax" the women are just objects of desire. Some progress.


  • ProfessorMortis

    ★★★½ Rewatched by ProfessorMortis 06 Oct, 2015

    Didn't love this one as much the second time around, but I may have just been too tired/distracted for it. In any case, still some absolutely wonderful impressionist influenced sets, great monster make-up, Fay Wray as beautiful as ever and giving her screams her all, and a whole lot of pre-Code hi-jinks in the form of Glenda Farrell's tough-as-nails intrepid girl reporter. Yes, there really isn't much of a mystery, but there are some good creepy moments and a fine performance from Atwill as a man driven insane by his losses.


  • fulci420

    Added by fulci420 7

    Took me a while to get into this rather talky affair but it wraps up in an enjoyable manner and I did appreciate seeing what director Michael Curtiz was doing with the genre way back when. Curtiz who of course directed "Casablanca" and 171 other films is an intriguing character in the history of film and I'm going to have to really go deep into his filmography some time.

    Their's certainly nothing to be scared about and you can see…


  • dadgumblah

    ★★★★ Added by dadgumblah

    This review reportedly contains spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Great, fun thriller with comic elements throughout. All about a wax museum proprietor, Ivan Igor, whose original museum is burned down by a scheming partner for the insurance money. Igor returns years later, bound to a wheelchair, ostensibly crippled, but of course, all is not as it seems. Bodies begin disappearing from the morgue and people are murdered, only to have their likenesses appear as wax figures of fame at the museum. Not so hard to figure out, eh?



  • Curtis

    ★★★½ Watched by Curtis 07 Jul, 2015

    This Michael Curtiz-helmed prototype for "House of Wax" is a lot of fun. Even as a fairly bloodless thriller, there's some genuinely creepy moments and some very cool set design on display.

    The final scene struck me as a little out-of-nowhere, but I haven't watched enough of these early 30's films to know whether that's how things worked.


  • WBA

    Added by WBA

    Glenda Farrell!
    And Lionel Atwin! And Fay Wray! And Two Strip Technicolor!

    Michael Curtiz proves once more (how many dozen times has he actually done this!?) that he's simply one of the greatest artistic geniuses ever, and even the intrusive censoring of the film (I'd assume some of it must have happened post-1934?) can't harm this scorcher.
    And did I mention Glenda Farrell?


  • Courtney Fifer

    ★★★ Watched by Courtney Fifer 15 Jun, 2015

    Not as entertaining as the Vincent Price version.