• Arthur Gadelha

    ★★★

    Assistir ao clássico de Werner Herzog no cinema é uma experiência bem construtiva. Principalmente por que toda a abordagem contemplativa para além da fantasia se torna mais físico. Seja pela trilha alta que insiste em remontar o clima em cena, ou pela fotografia que artificializa ainda mais o expressionismo do qual nasceu a obra. Para um espectador de 2017, fica a dúvida se o teor cômico é algo consciente de Herzog (talvez por compreender a proximidade da fantasia absurda com…

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  • richbwilll

    ★★★

    Good take on the original.

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  • Jacob Walker

    ★★★★★

    Simply wall to wall brilliance. Herzog captures, what I can only imagine to be, the clearest depiction of death as a pathetic vile creature of darkness and weakness played masterfully by Herzog's psychotic muse, Klaus Kinski. This movie is hypnotic and more dream-like than any other film I have seen. It lulls you into a trance and then slowly releases a wave of terror and absurdity upon you. This waves slowly consumes and arrests you, like the inevitable end awaiting us all. There is nothing like the horror and beauty of this film. It is one of the all time greats.

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  • BrisFrankie

    ★★★★★

    Third feature film by Herzog from my boxset and I don't know if I'm just picking the best ones (could be, I'm watching all the ones with Klaus Kinski first) but each one has been brilliant and this is my favourite so far. I got the mesmerising performance I was expecting from Kinski, but also Bruno Ganz, Isabelle Adjani and Roland Topor were excellent (and Adjani is stunning, I will be looking for more of her films). Beautiful to watch…

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  • Katie Gibelyou

    ★★½

    Nosferatu can be appreciated in its tribute to German cinema of the past, for infusing the story with a strong woman who takes action to fight the villain, and the character design and performance of Dracula. However, when stacked up again the original film, the 1922 source material is superior in terms of its technical achievement, stylistic brashness, and overall creepiness. Sometimes, you just can’t beat the film that did it first.

    Full review: www.gibelwho.com/home/nosferatu-phantom-der-nacht

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  • Quan_Chi

    ★★★½

    I have two questions that may have simple enough answers, but I guess I'm missing them:

    If Dracula found living forever such a miserable fate why didn't he stop complaining and just go walk out in the damn sun himself?

    At the end, when Jonathan has made his transformation into a vampire, why is he perfectly fine in the sun? Like, right after Dracula gets tricked in to dying in the sun?

    If someone has one or both answers that'd be dope.

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  • Yuta Ito

    Count Dracula sent me a letter from "Transleevania"

    A more modern version of the 1922 classic, with better visuals and extant dialogue. But it is a laughable film, parallel only in its plot. The acting is pathetic, Lucy Harker's accent is unfitting, the imagery is strange, Topor is hysterical, and the final outcome is rather a comedy of sorts despite its intentions.

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  • Hayden Gilbert

    ★★★★

    In several ways, Herzog's Vampyre provides and interesting contrast to Coppola's Dracula

    The former lacks all of the latter's lavishly stagey production.  Absent of artifice, Nosferatu is natural in location, performance, and camerawork. The mountains and beaches and courtyards feel as if they are pulled from dreams, but are all locales of our real world. Werner Herzog, a man not known for his interest in traditional folkloric horror, brings a unique perspective to his adaptation of one of Germany's most…

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  • 10aflyViper

    ★★★

    Odd and dreamlike, Nosferatu turned out to be one of the more interesting Dracula adaptations I've seen. Kinski's Dracula should be iconic, and Isabelle Adjani is hypnotizing. Although I enjoyed it, I will say the weakest elements are Renfield and the disjointedness of the story in the final third of the film. Still, beautifully shot movie.

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  • Alex Case

    ★★★★★

    How do you take a silent film, that's one of the most iconic works of German Expressionist cinema alongside the Cabinet of Doctor Caligari, remake it in late '70s and in color, and have it work just as well? You have Werner Herzog do it, apparently.

    A quick note on the version of the film I watched. For purposes of this review, I watched the English language release, as opposed to the German subtitled release, as that version was unavailable…

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  • Nexkez6

    ★★★★

    "Time is an abyss...profound as a thousand nights."

    Though it has the same story structure, Herzog takes a more painterly approach to his remake of the silent classic.
    Landscapes and interiors are beautifully shot, the fog rolling along the beach, Lucy screaming Jonathans name in he bed as Van Helsing and the servants look on, examples of classical art in the way they are composed.
    Klaus Kinski's performance dominates the picture as the sad, brooding, Count Dracula with his animalistic…

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  • Lilith Elizabeth

    ★★★★½

    Francis Ford Coppola can suck it and I prefer this over the original Nosferatu too because let's be honest this one has Isabelle Adjani.

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