• Gary Busey

    ★★★★★ Watched by Gary Busey 28 Jun, 2015

    The Big Sleep is one of the most seductively staged noir crime thrillers to come out of the 40's, propelled by it's incredible lead performances from Bogart and Bacall. It's plot is a bit convoluted, but to any viewer able to appreciate noir elements, the film is a treat. It is arguable a high point in the 40's affair with the English language, and is incredibly well directed and acted.

    If only I knew what was going on...

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  • Silversaxophone

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Silversaxophone 24 Jun, 2015

    If Raymond Chandler didn't conceive his Marlowe as Bogart it's only because Bogart as a screen persona didn't exist when Chandler wrote his novel. For Bogart is the definitive Marlowe, a more optimistic and happier version of Chandler's character. In some ways he's similar to Hammett's Sam Spade, but he's not a bastard and his sense of irony is playful rather than cynical. He's part of a similar reinterpretation Howard Hawks gave to Hemingway's To Have or Have Not where…

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  • Andrew Glass

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Andrew Glass 22 Jun, 2015

    I don't care if this is a big studio cash in on the noir genre that pretty much ignored any semblance of making sense. I don't care if this was more or less a vehicle for Lauren Bacall to get her career back on track.

    It's great!

    I don't remember every female character in Chandler's book throwing herself at Phillip Marlowe. But I'll take it. Especially the minxy book store girl who after taking off her glasses and putting down…

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  • Kevin

    ★★★★★ Added by Kevin

    Perhaps the most extensive research paper I ever did in high school was for Raymond Chandler's The Big Sleep. I broke the book down, drew outlines and diagrams, looked into patterns, read tons of published articles. Everything in the story does shockingly connect. In fact, discovering as to how they all connected made it even more fascinating then people. The movie does a really good job of adapting such a difficult book, though it does miss a few ingredients making…

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  • Gabirus

    ★★★★★ Watched by Gabirus 02 Jun, 2015

    So badass and so cool....

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  • Alberto Celma

    ★★★★★ Watched by Alberto Celma 23 May, 2015

    It goes from point A to point B without explanation, so no wonder the first reaction to this movie is going to be being at lost. The plot is convoluted; there are a couple of characters appearing with their own agendas that add to the general confusion. But it’s a testament to this movie's greatness that it doesn’t matter, not because a lack of logical conclusions –it has, sort of- but because the main thing is to watch it unfold.…

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  • Rick Burin

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Rick Burin 03 May, 2015

    Pre-release version (1945) ****

    *A FEW SPOILERS*

    The Big Sleep is one of the most purely entertaining films of the 1940s, a zingy, slangy, sexy slice of film noir that takes full advantage of a classic Raymond Chandler story, a script by three of the best writers in Hollywood (including Leigh Brackett, who co-wrote Rio Bravo and The Empire Strikes Back), and Bogie and Bacall's sizzling chemistry.

    Shabby detective Philip Marlowe (Bogart) is hired by the ailing General Sternwood (Charles…

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  • Michael Strenski

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Michael Strenski 15 Mar, 2015

    The best Chandler adaptation. The best Bogart-Bacall film. The funniest movie of 1946. The best noir of them all.

    And yet it's not the best Howard Hawks film. That's how good that bastard was.

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  • Cass Nicholas

    ★★★★★ Watched by Cass Nicholas 24 Feb, 2015

    ughhhhhhhhhhhh I can't describe how much I love this

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  • KasperL

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by KasperL 22 Jan, 2015

    Bogart IS Marlowe. And the dialogue is this freaking cool: "I don't mind if you don't like my manners, I don't like them myself. They are pretty bad. I grieve over them on long winter evenings."

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  • Alec Price

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Alec Price 17 Jan, 2015

    A fiendishly convoluted noir, The Big Sleep is a masterclass in obfuscation, hiding its mysteries within a near impenetrable labyrinthine structure, where who killed who is ultimately rendered an abstract question. Bogart is on top form as the most famous of P.I. Philip Marlowe's screen incarnations, and he's matched by the bewitching Lauren Bacall, their sparkling interplay fizzing with sexual chemistry. Indeed, given the constraints of the Production Code, Hawks' renowned adaptation of Chandler's lurid pulp fiction is impressively bawdy, where friskiness abounds even in rare book stores. Delightfully devious.

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  • Noel Hahn

    ★★★★★ Watched by Noel Hahn 13 Jan, 2015

    2015: 52 Weeks of Film: Week 3, Film 1 of 3

    Being a huge fan of Film Noir, specifically 1940's Film Noir, it is not a surprise that I liked this film so much.

    The writing, quick banter and innuendos are perfect. Humphrey Bogart is his usual self- the brooding detective with a bite to him. And the female leads have some gumption to them.

    Overall, fantastic.

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