• Patrick Pryor

    ★★★ Watched by Patrick Pryor 12 Aug, 2014

    Above average slasher (written by the Weinstein Brothers!) with some nicely composed sequences -- loved those tracking shots through the forest and the silhouetted murderer in the boat. It also boldly replaces the final girl with a grody teen-boy peeper. Unlike other camp outings gone gory entries in the horror genre, I actually cared about these characters a little. They had no particular hand in creating the burn victim murderer and were just looking to have a fun time at…

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  • Jerry Downing

    ★★★★½ Rewatched by Jerry Downing 03 Aug, 2014

    Such a great slasher flick from the early 80's. Tom Savini's makeup effects are amazing.

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  • COBRARocky

    ★★★★ Added by COBRARocky

    The Burning is pretty original for a film about a tormented killer seeking revenge on kids at a summer camp.

    It's better than any of the Friday the 13ths, and I say that as a fan of the F13 series. This is one of the very few slasher movies where I actually gave a shit about the victims. All the camp shenanigans leading up to the killings dont feel like just filler, they're actually fun to watch. Cropsy is an awesome villain and Jason Alexander (and his ass) are in it, plus Tom Savini when he was in his prime. The raft scene is legendary.

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  • David

    ★★★ Added by David

    The Adventures of Young Costanza: The Slasher Years

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  • Trish

    ★★★★ Watched by Trish 14 Jun, 2014

    My husband convinced me to watch some 80s horror... surprisingly entertaining with a young George Costanza.

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  • merZbau

    ★★★½ Watched by merZbau 18 Jul, 2014

    This review reportedly contains spoilers. I can handle the truth.

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  • Adam Lowes

    ★★½ Watched by Adam Lowes 14 Jul, 2014

    An ok little slasher, once part of that 80's list of so-called 'video nasties'. There's some gleefully gory set-pieces scattered throughout (the canoe massacre sequence undoubtedly sparked the film's notoriety) and it's also one of the first Miramax films, with the brothers Weinstein on co-writing and producing duties.

    Look out for George Costanza as a surprisingly buff high school jock.

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  • James Id

    ★★★★ Rewatched by James Id 10 Jul, 2014

    Friday the 13th part II if it was more believable, had more future stars, and was even more violent.

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  • Kip Bowman Jr.

    ★★★½ Watched by Kip Bowman Jr. 09 Jul, 2014

    My continuation of 80's slasher films continues. Next up is 1981's horror classic The Burning. Which was actual co-written and produced by Bob and Harvey Weinstein. Yes, those Weinstein brothers of Miramax and The Weinstein Company fame.

    The premise the Burning is: A caretaker at a summer camp is burned when a prank goes tragically wrong. After several years of intensive treatment at hospital, he is released back into society, albeit missing some social skills.

    What follows is a bloody…

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  • Tyler Featherstone

    ★★★★ Watched by Tyler Featherstone 05 Jul, 2014

    That 80s slasher flick about the summer campers and a killer seeking revenge on them in the woods. You know that one with the impressive special effects by Tom Savini. Yeah, no. No, the other one. The one where George Costanza shows his ass.

    Despite sharing a very similar plot to another prominent slasher flick, "The Burning" delivers everything you'd want in a slasher without getting too sleazy. There's blood, some gore and a couple girls loose their tops (and…

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  • T. Heilman

    ★★★★ Rewatched by T. Heilman 02 Jul, 2014

    Exceptionally well shot and acted for this type of sub-genre film, The Burning gives the slasher fan everything they want, incredible mayhem, gratuitous nudity (male and female), pranks and hijinx, unlikable characters receiving their well-earned comeuppances.
    One of the best from the slasher golden age.

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  • Lars Sieval

    ★★★½ Watched by Lars Sieval 30 Jun, 2014

    Teenagers getting slaughtered in the woods with the effects done by Tom Savini? Awesome!

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