• Rob Smith

    ★★★★ Watched by Rob Smith 21 Apr, 2014

    Two penniless American drifters in Mexico run into an old prospector and throw in with him to try their hand and finding gold. But the deprivations of the wilderness, the threat of bandits, and their own greed and paranoia start to threaten their friendship and their lives.

    Director and screenwriter John Huston directed his father, Walter, in his Oscar winning performance as the prospector while Humphrey Bogart is also outstanding as the increasingly suspicious Dobbs. This classic hasn't dated as much as many other films from this era and the ironic twist at the end still stands up.

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  • Daniel Charchuk

    ★★★★½ Watched by Daniel Charchuk 21 Jan, 2010

    A terrific tale of greed and fate. Bogart has, perhaps, never been better.

    "I don't have to show you any steenkin' badges!"

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  • Christian Katzorke

    ★★ Watched by Christian Katzorke 13 Apr, 2014

    Interesting setup, cool Bogey. Overall not my kind of movie...

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  • Chris

    ★★★★ Added by Chris

    A tragic and compelling tale of man's obsession, propelled by a phenomenal turn from the always-reliable Humph.

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  • Tom Campbell

    ★★★★ Watched by Tom Campbell 12 Apr, 2014

    A classic parable on the dangers of greed and how it can change a man, this film centers on two down-on-their-luck drifters who wind up in a town south of the border begging for scraps. After listening to an old man's tales of prospecting, they decide to pool the money they're able to get their hands on and, with the old man as a mentor and partner, proceed into the mountains to seek their fortune in gold. However, their partnership…

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  • Arik Devens

    ★★★★ Watched by Arik Devens 28 Mar, 2014

    This is a film about temptation and greed. The kind of temptation that happens when a man suddenly sees infinite possibility staring him in the face. When he sees an opportunity to get everything he ever wanted and suddenly he’s doing things he never would have done before. The kind that leads him to lose sight of everything he believes in, filling his head with jealousy and suspicion, until he becomes capable of anything, even murder.

    The story here is…

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  • Aljosa

    ★★★★½ Watched by Aljosa 28 Mar, 2014

    Bogey is one fucked up dude

    so good

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  • kara

    ★★★★ Watched by kara 25 Mar, 2014

    "Get away from my burro!"

    Dobbs is a little crazy. I can see how Breaking Bad mirrored a few instances from this film. Great day off kind of film!

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  • Colonel_Dax

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Colonel_Dax 24 Mar, 2014

    One of the best depictions in any medium of the pratfalls of greed, the final scene makes the great greater by adding in elements that could be considered near-biblical. The slow burn of paranoia gradually morphing into outright insanity is still to this day near unparalleled in its perfect escalation of stakes and subsequent tension.

    The Treasure of the Sierra Madre was one of the first films to be shot entirely on location, and though it resulted in what must…

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  • Ben Richards

    ★★★★½ Watched by Ben Richards 21 Mar, 2014

    Although I found the Treasure of Sierra Madre did share some traits with The Man Who Would be King (which I recently viewed for the first time also) in that it centered around several strong male leads and their pursuit for money and power this was a much darker film.

    Humphrey Bogart plays the man at the center of Madre's main plot and it is his character arc and transformation throughout the film from a man just trying to get…

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  • Nathannnnn Phillipssssss

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Nathannnnn Phillipssssss 23 Mar, 2014

    This review reportedly contains spoilers. I can handle the truth.

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  • Taylor Cole

    ★★★★½ Watched by Taylor Cole 16 Mar, 2014

    I kinda wish that THIS was the version of Humphrey that appeared to Woody Allen in 'Play it Again, Sam.' Then, of course, Allen would have had to title his film 'We Don't Need No Stinkin' Badges.'

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