• merkstreet

    ★★★★★ Watched by merkstreet 09 Feb, 2016

    What I Learnt From: Touch of Evil

    I'm always impressed how involved I get in a Orson Welles' film. There is real bite in the script, in a way you just don't expect from the 1950s. The typical noir tropes are evident here, but they hide well behind great performances and a compelling story. A definite loss of innocence tale, in which the corrupt are proven to be right in their results while wrong in their methods.

    One of the…

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  • Tom Watchorn

    ★★★★½ Watched by Tom Watchorn 05 Aug, 2015

    Orson Welles was weighty. I think that’s universally agreed. Influence-wise, in terms of mythologising and the shadow cast over subsequent Hollywood studio artistry, for sure. Corporeally also, later in life. But additionally in content; often lean in running time, Welles pictures nevertheless feel monolithic. Sometimes for the technical bravura exhibited, sometimes for scope, sometimes just for the presence of the latter-day filmmaker and (he says, reservedly) auteur himself. The Lady From Shanghai however is surprisingly sprightly.

    Known principally for the…

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  • cameff

    ★★★★ Watched by cameff 04 Feb, 2016

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    The first few minutes of this movie has a really long tracking shot done in a single take. It's worth watching for that alone, however the rest of the movie is pretty awesome as well. Fairly typical film noir set on a mexican border town where cops from both sides aren't showing their full hands to each other. Very dark lighting in the night scenes. There's a few of what would be ordinary shots but then Welles just adds something…

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  • Blots

    ★★★★ Watched by Blots 03 Feb, 2016

    I'm glad I was able to get out of the long shadow cast by endless discussions about this film's opening shot and discover the incredibly vibrant filmmaking of Welles beyond it. ‘Touch of Evil’ crackles now, in 2016 – I can’t imagine what it would have been like for audiences during its release, even with its supposedly butchered edit.

    Love the imagery of the desert, camera movement/pans, the proximity of everything. I don't think I've ever been made so queasy just by the blocking of characters in a frame.

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  • Jake O.

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Jake O. 01 Feb, 2016

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    When talking about Touch of Evil, most people bring up the three-minute unbroken tracking shot that opens the film, but I'm more partial to the scene near the end where Quinlan savagely murders Uncle Joe. It's almost diametrically opposed to the aforementioned oner - all close-ups and jarring cuts, succinctly reflecting the desperate recourse of a man drunk on more than just liquor. It's Welles firing on all cylinders - as an actor and a filmmaker.

    Let's be real, though, this whole thing is cinematic gold.

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  • Philip Carroll

    ★★★½ Watched by Philip Carroll 30 Jan, 2016 1

    This is considered to be one of Orson Welles' best films that I've been wanting to watch for a long time. Plus, I love a good film noir. It was not what I expected at all.

    A car bomb goes off in a couple's car that is crossing the border from Mexico to the US. A drug enforcement official for the Mexican government (Charlton Heston) and his newly wed wife (Janet Leigh) witness it so Heston takes it upon himself…

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  • Michael Whitlock

    ★★★★½ Watched by Michael Whitlock 31 Jan, 2016

    Come on, read my future for me.

    You haven't got any. . . Your future's all used up.

    A tale of racism at the US-Mexico border, detective fraud, love and murder and kidnapping, yet somehow incredibly human in its representation of the gray area and almost good side of villains and the anger and bad side of heroes, this is one intricately told story.

    Orson Welles really does show he is a master. I couldn't help but notice some very…

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  • cjdx

    ★★★ Watched by cjdx 01 Feb, 2016

    I don't really get why this is rated so highly

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  • Devan Scott

    ★★★★★ Rewatched by Devan Scott 30 Jan, 2016

    ('98 Murch & Co. Restoration)
    It's neat seeing 70s-era Walter Murch sound design in a 1958 Orson Welles noir.

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  • dartagnan

    ★★★ Watched by dartagnan 31 Jan, 2016

    "I'm not good, I'm not nice, I'm just right!" seems like it could be Hank Quinlan's motto. A crooked cop who plants evidence to speed up justice, he gets his nose severely put out of joint by idealist do-gooder Miguel Vargas, a Mexican cop who is, bafflingly, played by not-terribly-Mexican Charlton Heston (although I suppose this is no stranger than casting Marlene Dietrich as a Mexican gypsy madam), and plots revenge.

    A story of bad things happening to good people.

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  • Luis Hernandez

    ★★★★½ Watched by Luis Hernandez 27 Jan, 2016

    What started like a normal film noir, gained second by second a solid and well performed story, full of suspense and extraordinary direction from Orson Welles. A must-see for every fan of the genre.

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  • YingaGarten

    ★★★★ Watched by YingaGarten 26 Jan, 2016

    Great noir crime thriller set in a Mexican border town, written and directed by a true master, Orson Welles. Along with these duties he also takes a memorable supporting turn as the corrupt police captain. Reliable performers such as Charlton Heston and Janet Leigh also star. The film is superbly shot and framed throughout with the opening tracking shot beginning the film brilliantly. Probably the last great noir film of the genre's classic era.

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