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  • Transcendence 2014

    ★½ Watched 16 Apr, 2014

    This is some mighty goofy shit — which would matter less if it didn’t take itself so very seriously. Yet it’s all very solemn and faux-prescient, even when Computer Will is using his scientific brilliance and wireless networking to create an army of indestructible self-healers (yes, seriously), but there are enough plot holes to fill the giant underground data center that Computer Will and Evelyn somehow construct in a week or two without anyone noticing. In fairness and even admiration, it must be noted that it is a film of ideas. It’s just that so many of them are bad ones.

    flavorwire.com/452465/why-do-cinematographers-make-such-lousy-directors/

  • Columbo

    ★★★★ Watched 15 Apr, 2014

    "Murder by the Book," directed by Spielberg, teleplay by Steven Bochco. These kids have a future, I tells ya.

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  • Under the Skin 2013

    ★★★★ Watched 21 Mar, 2014

    A beautiful, bizarre, and occasionally troubling bit of abstract art-house sci-fi in the Beyond the Black Rainbow vein from director Jonathan Glazer (Sexy Beast, Birth). Scarlett Johansson (who appears in just about every frame) plays a well-disguised alien creature who picks up men and devours them; some have dismissed the picture as an indie riff on Species, but if the narrative is derivative and a tad monotonous, there’s something intoxicating about the fluidity of Glazer’s striking images and the mood he manages to sustain throughout the peculiar tale.

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    flavorwire.com/449605/what-scarlett-johanssons-new-movie-under-the-skin-tells-us-about-her-gross-new-yorker-profile/

  • Boyhood 2014

    ★★★★½ Watched 20 Jan, 2014

    Richard Linklater and his cast shot this chronicle of a young man’s life in bits and pieces over 12 years, a narrative feat all but unparalleled in modern cinema. But the great pleasure of Boyhood is how its tremendous ambition is belied by the picture’s charming modesty; in its pacing and approach, it is very much in the shambling vein of the Before trilogy and Slacker. It also shares those films’ verbosity, its characters frequently engaging in searching conversations about…