Mulholland Drive 2001 ★★★★★

I should be annoyed by this film's stubborn refusal to make a lick of sense, but I'm not. Not one bit. Over a decade after I first saw it, MULHOLLAND DRIVE remains as sumptuous and mesmerising an experience as ever. I'm almost inclined to suggest that to try to decode it and impose rational logic on it is to miss the point - better to just let the sounds and images wash over you and experience it as Diane (the fabulous Naomi Watts)'s hypnotic fever dream. But still, it's undeniably fun to speculate. What is the significance of the manic old couple? Who is the monster who lives behind Winky's? And what's with the cowboy?

7 Comments

  • I couldn't agree more — being able to impose rational logic on a film is certainly not a prerequisite for enjoying it; though I do admit to gaining something from finding a thorough writeup the morning after which explained some of the connections, themes, and timings of events. Must be about time for a re-watch :)

  • Was it the Salon.com article? That shed a lot of light on the film for me, along with the audio commentary by Sean Weitner and Andy Ross of Flak Magazine (www.flakmag.com/film/commentary/mulholland.html).

  • Yes, I think it actually was the Salon one. I'll have to check out the audio commentary — thanks for the link :)

  • Michael, glad me and Andy could be of service to you. We really enjoyed working on that.

  • No problem, Sean. Anything I can do to spread the word about your commentary to others who were in the same boat as me: mesmerised by the film but completely baffled as to what it was all about.

  • Michael, I don't think it's even extant on the web anymore. So you'll probably just have to prowl through neighborhoods, peeping in windows to see if anyone is watching, and then handing them a pre-loaded mp3 player.

  • Ah, that's a real shame. I'm not even sure I still have the MP3 lying around, or I'd offer to host it on my own web space. :(

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