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  • Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

    Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

    ★★★½

    I'm still mourning the loss of Tarantino's long time editor Sally Menke. All his films after her death have been plodding and overlong.

    This one is too, but I found this depiction of 1960's Hollywood irresistible... the clothes, the cars, the music on the radio. All the actors put on excellent performances and they are all extremely good looking.

    There's a melancholy but good-hearted vibe to the thing which I didn't expect from the director of "Deathproof". As disjointed as…

  • Midsommar

    Midsommar

    ★★★★½

    Once these recognizable characters get to Sweden, I began staring at screen with a look of disbelief, disgust, awe... wondering, could this get weirder? Could this get more f**ed up? Yes, yes of course it could.

    This is an immersive film experience that evokes a powerful mood (think The Shining, Taxi Driver). I did have some minor quibbles with the (mostly awesome) screenplay, notably as the commune's practices are revealed to the American tourists, they seem too unperturbed. But otherwise…

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  • Paterson

    Paterson

    ★★★★

    Jarmusch finds magic in the mundane. Mac DeMarco says, "You're better off dead - when you're mind's been set - from nine until five" but Paterson might say otherwise. His remarkably simple life allows him to stay present and focus in on the details of his life. He is so tuned in that slight changes to his day (like conversations with strangers, for instance) become events. This slow-paced movie drew me in as I fell in love with all of the characters, each of whom is fleshed out and specific. Watch it before bed and you'll feel so relaxed. The contentment in this film is contagious.

  • Non-Fiction

    Non-Fiction

    ★★★★

    If you like well-off Parisians eating and drinking and discussing art and having affairs, this is the movie for you. Thoughtful discussions all around, from changes in the publishing industry (whether or not to embrace the digital) to the ethics of making fiction out of autobiographical material. Everyone has a balanced opinion and a glass of wine in their hand.

    I love Rohmer, and his movies were probably a big influence. Glad Assayas is carrying the torch and exploring questions (like the future of the written word) that postdate Rohmer.