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  • Richard Jewell

    Richard Jewell

    ★★★★

    As libertarian in ideology as I’ve seen Clint, Richard Jewell is fantastically managed cynicism. Watching an absurdly polite man raised to respect authority who fetishized the police to the point of even illegally assuming their level of legal authority given even the slightest hint of power gradually lose his faith in the guardrails of democratic society sounds more didactic and pessimistic than it ends up being. Rather, seeing the Jewell family come to terms with the erosion of their rural…

  • The Squid and the Whale

    The Squid and the Whale

    ★★★★★

    The first time I saw this movie I was around Walt’s age. I connected to the film through the lens of my awkward and sexually-charged late teens. I wasn’t too far from Frank’s adolescent discovery phase to see myself in his strange, cathartic, angst-driven exploits. Now I’m closer to Bernard’s age and finding myself appreciating the levity and nuance with which Baumbach handles divorce and the hilariously facile veneer of intellectual superiority that nudges Bernard along. The way Walt and…

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  • Sully

    Sully

    ★★★★½

    "It's been a while since New York had news this good... especially with an airplane in it."

    Jon Ronson wrote a book titled, "So You've Been Publicly Shamed." It sought to expose a vicious proclivity in the hive mind of indignant masses. While Sully is hardly shamed in the eyes of the public, the same can't be said of the NTSB or the media; inclined as it is to service tension and forge doubt even in those having directly participated…

  • Canyon Passage

    Canyon Passage

    ★★★★★

    Easily one of the best Westerns I've ever seen, CANYON PASSAGE is elegant, intricate, nuanced and just phenomenally crafted. The writing is as vibrant as the Pacific Northwest colors that embolden the environs. At once masterfully low key and simmering with wanderlust and unrealized romance, CANYON PASSAGE derives much of its drama from questions of an existential nature. What does "home" mean in the era of burgeoning metropolises? Competing theories play out side by side as homesteaders find their "home"…