Nights and Weekends ★★★

How much you enjoy NIGHTS AND WEEKENDS will largely depend on your tolerance for quirky facial tics, soul patches and clumsy nudity.

The more Joe Swanberg films I see, the harder it is to categorise exactly what it is he's doing in each one. This time he shares directing and starring duties with sometime co-writer Greta Gerwig, who brings a languorous approach to the teasing out of insecurities and cracks in the lead couple's long-distance relationship.

It's very much a film of two halves, which is to say that I enjoyed the latter half much more the latter. Exploring the Not Long Before and Quite Long After of a break-up, NIGHTS AND WEEKEND rarely shows Swanberg and Gerwig apart, despite the fact that they live in different cities, and it's a good choice; the forced intimacy of such an arrangement results in sometimes stilted conversation, petty fights and occasional shafts of brutal honesty breaking out of the relaxed facades of the leads.

There's plenty of emotional wretchedness to be found here - especially in the excruciating pauses where both leads are clearly silently deciding whether or not to keep fighting for the doomed relationship - but there's also a fair amount of tedium. I've recently been on a voyage of mumblecore discovery so I'm no stranger to the appearance of dullness in a film like this, but I usually have more patience for it. This may be due to the fact that there are almost no secondary characters so I couldn't wonder about what they might be doing while Gerwig and Swanberg talk about whether or not they're going to shower together, and the film becomes a chamber piece that just doesn't have enough narrative momentum to carry you all the way through readily.

I found the second half of the film, in which the former couple reunite, first as friends and then almost as lovers, much more engaging, though more perhaps due to my own personal identification with that situation than anything else. That still counts, mind, and it was impressive to see Swanberg and Gerwig's willingness to display the absurd dance former romantic partners do for all its naked (both figuratively and very literally) self-deceit, discomfort and ultimately sadness.

...Shit. I was going to give this a 2.5 but I've just turned over those two scenes of Gerwig and Swanberg crying on their own in my head so I'm giving it an extra half. (In the latter Gerwig's present, but she was done mourning this relationship a while before he will be.) There's a lot of truth in those moments - when a relationship ends, you don't get that shoulder to cry on any more. You're alone, even when the person you used to care for is right there. Greta Gerwig can run the full emotional spectrum in a single take without ever seeming insincere or contrived (or, rather, her myriad contrivances make her that much more real), and as a result I identified far more with her than Swanberg's character. She wants to believe things can go back to the way they used to be, but she's nowhere near optimistic or dumb enough to think that things could ever last.

A sympathetic anti-romance and an interesting curiosity for both directors' careers (especially Gerwig, considering I just saw the luminous MISTRESS AMERICA which she co-wrote with current beau Noah Baumbach), NIGHTS AND WEEKENDS nevertheless fails to hit hard where it wants to and by the end can't muster a thematic statement stronger than Sometimes Love Doesn't Work.

Which is true, but that doesn't make it poignant.

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