Trainwreck ★★½

I really expected more. TRAINWRECK is a conventional rom-com dressed up in the edgy honesty of Amy Schumer's humour and the obscuring improv of Judd Apatow, and neither of them does as well as they could have.

Any film over two hours long needs to fight for your attention more than others, but Apatow (directing from Schumer's first feature script) lets most scenes run far longer than they should and the result is often tedious. If you're going to have a scene in which tertiary characters are the only ones speaking, at least make it semi-relevant to the story, maybe?

Schumer is fine in her first leading role (and it is incredibly refreshing to see a woman of her body type as the romantic lead. She's not particularly strange or different, other than the fact that she looks like a real friggin' woman) but brings little her stand-up material doesn't already exhibit.

For the record, I think she's a great comedian, but her script is a real sheep in wolf's clothing. She starts out a confident, independent character (albeit an alcoholic one) and finishes up compromising pretty much her entire way of life for one man. The film takes the archaic stance that ONLY MONOGAMY CAN WORK and anyone who takes multiple partners must be either morally bankrupt or have serious character flaws based largely in daddy issues.

I love Brie Larson - she's steadily becoming one of my favourite working actresses - but in this she's simply reduced to an oasis of morality: get a husband! Have a kid! Paint your next kid's room pink BECAUSE THAT'S HOW WE KNOW SHE'S A GIRL! (That particular piece of heteronormativity was eye-rollingly outdated.) She does well with the material as does her husband played by Mike Birbiglia, who gets to perform some of the rare moments of genuine discomfort in the film. These are what makes it worth watching; moments when characters butt heads about what is and isn't socially acceptable.

Unfortunately this makes up very little of TRAINWRECK as Schumer's character (conveniently also named Amy) lets most everyone force their morality upon her. It's not about what Amy will do with her life; it's about when she'll fall in line with everyone else's.

Yes, I did laugh a few times, because, well - have you seen the cast? But I grimaced a hell of a lot more.

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