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  • Exit Through the Gift Shop

    Exit Through the Gift Shop

    ★★★★

    Fascinating doc, not necessarily for the showing us anything particularly illuminating about Banksy but for its portrait of filmmaker/artist Thierry Guetta. Superficially similar to The Kid Stays In The Picture, it so thoroughly discredits and ridicules Guetta whilst claiming to draw no conclusions, as to appear as phoney as the Banksy-inspired art show Guetta puts on in the doc’s final act. That isn’t to say it isn’t compelling, anxious filmmaking, just that it also comes across as a little mean-spirited.

  • The Children Act

    The Children Act

    ★★

    Briskly directed by Richard Eyre, The Children Act is on the morally manipulative end of the Ian McEwan spectrum. The early court scenes are probably the best, but their lack of rigour eventually unravels into histrionics that the writing fails to make believable. Thank heavens for Emma Thompson, at the top of her game and navigating every crack in her character’s façade with an aplomb that the film doesn’t deserve.

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  • Avengers: Infinity War

    Avengers: Infinity War

    ★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    As overstuffed as you’d imagine it to be, and, nineteen films into the franchise, weightless. I had so many questions at the end of this film, like why does Thanos’s evil scheme make no sense? Where is Nebula at the end? Why is Falcon able to overcome a bad guy that can apparently beat Scarlet Witch, the most powerful Avenger of them all? A lot of the action sequences are nail-biting, but I wish anyone knew how to make Iron…

  • BPM (Beats per Minute)

    BPM (Beats per Minute)

    ★★★★

    A wider canvas for Campillo and he fills it beautifully. I can't remember the last film I saw where the large supporting cast was so well-defined, and whose relationships to one another within the narrative were so piercingly felt without the need for reams of exposition. Nathan is a beautiful cypher, and the film sort of solidifies into something slightly more conventional than what its first half would have you think, but this is loud, intelligent, talky cinema. The cross-talk…