Meatball Machine

Meatball Machine

Just like you and me, directors Yudai Yamaguchi and Juichi Yamamoto grew up on American 80s horror splatter films. If it sprayed, it played, as the saying goes. But they also loved the classic monster and superhero stories of their native Japan, like Kamen Rider. As budding filmmakers, they wondered, what if they could combine body horror with the effects of tokusatsu television shows and America’s obsession with dangerous weapons and senseless violence? And what if, just like Doritos, they could make it extreme? More blood, more gore, more action, more squished heads that explode with strawberry jelly and rotting meat, more everything. The flow of horror had mostly gone from West to East, but Yamaguchi and Yamamoto wanted to reverse the tide and show the West how it’s done. Yamamoto had written and directed the short version of MEATBALL MACHINE in 1999, and then teamed up with Yamaguchi with this full-length feature. The result of a longer runtime means more ambition and more exploration of things that squish, and we have the privilege of bearing witness.

Read the full review by Annie Choi:
bleedingskull.com/meatball-machine-2005/