Burrows

Burrows Pro

Favorite films

  • The Shining
  • All That Jazz
  • Mulholland Drive
  • Crash

Recent activity

All
  • Let Them All Talk

    ★★★★

  • Silent Night, Deadly Night

    ★★★

  • Star 80

    ★★★★★

  • A Nightmare on Elm Street

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

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  • Let Them All Talk

    Let Them All Talk

    ★★★★

    I really like LET THEM ALL TALK, but I don't REALLY, REALLY like LET THEM ALL TALK. This film is a Soderberghian call back to SEX LIES AND VIDEOTAPE. In SEX LIES, a small cast of characters are brought together. Their bond formed in University, and and now they are looking forward on their lives--or at least looking at their present-day--their values, and how they interact with each other. LET THEM ALL TALK features a similar dynamic (sort of). Streep…

  • Silent Night, Deadly Night

    Silent Night, Deadly Night

    ★★★

    SILENT NIGHT DEADLY NIGHT is certainly a lightweight little slasher chiller. It's got a low budget, simple means, and possibly even amateur actors. However, there's a self-serious, dedicate procedural approach in this by the filmmakers to go through the material in way that honors the script and the emerging slasher genre.

    The opening 20 minutes make for an exemplary sequence of exposition. Little Billy has to go to see his catatonic grandfather--creepy old folks homes could legitimately be traumatic experiences…

Popular reviews

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  • 1917

    1917

    ★★★½

    With all of its production value, gimmicky roving camera, and (falsely advertised) real-time narrative, 1917 is impressive to experience, but honestly is a little light on an emotional core. George MacKay and Dean-Charles Chapman lack the weight, it seems, to make me care about them. Honestly, the long, 'look-at-me' shots have such forward momentum and 'what's next' drama, the audience never really gets a moment to slow down and get to know these young soldiers. And, that's what I think…

  • Nomadland

    Nomadland

    ★★★★½

    The reference to 'Nomad' in the title of Chloe Zhao's new film has a twofold meaning. Quite literally, Frances McDormand lives a nomadic existence. She lives in her van and travels across the expanse of the US countryside, stopping along the way for periods of seasonal work. She's like a member of an ancient pre-agriculture civilization, always moving, no home, following a roaming food source. Only she roams and camps in her van. In Zhao's film, Nomad also refers to…