Fireworks

Fireworks

This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

This review may contain spoilers.

This film is nice and serene or tender from the start. The music is soft and slow, almost nostalgic. First off I love the detail of how Horibe’s daughter draws a picture for him in his detective’s journal even though she’s not supposed to because while it’s not something you think of happening it’s a very real detail of what could happen to a detective with a young child. It’s a small detail but I just love it so much. I honestly love this film so much. From the score to the tender moments between Nishi and his wife, Miyuki, to the art that Horibe paints to express his new view of the world, all of it is wonderfully beautiful. NIshi is a man of few words but honestly, this film isn't much about the dialogue but more about the visuals of what's happening. It's all about the little moments and showing things that you wouldn't expect like an ex-cop robbing a bank or animals that have been painted to have flowers for heads. The moments that Nishi and Miyuki share as they go on their final trip together and all the small troubles they face along the way are great because they just laugh at any sort of inconvenience that arises because that's all one really can do. These two people have faced the biggest inconveniences that life can throw at a person with having their child die young and now facing Miyuki's death in the near future as she battles her terminal illness, so they just take life as it goes and laugh off the small things. This film has easily become one of my favorites as I just think it's one of the most beautiful films I've seen without ever being too extravagant. Also, the final moment of the film where the score makes you think it's going to fade off, and then it's interrupted by the two gunshots that Nishi fires to kill either the two cops after him or his wife and himself is one that sits with you as you see the girl with the kite look back toward the sound of the gunshots, toward the camera, which is reminiscent of the final shot of The 400 Blows (1959) and the film ends looking at the expression on her face as the credits roll on this beautiful by Takeshi Kitano

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