Onibaba

Onibaba

This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

This review may contain spoilers.

Kaneto Shindo's Onibaba is nothing short of sensational. A dark pit that holds within it the bodies of countless samurai who have been killed by women trying to survive. Tall susuki grass that hides all the wrongdoings of people in desperate situations. Midnight runs through the grass on the way to satisfy an unquenchable lust. Glances that mean more than words could about what is seen by one person and not by the other. The foreboding swaying of the grass that tells of eery things to come. A mask that is bound to curse whoever uses it for an evil purpose, turning what was once human to be something that is demonic. All of this is packed into a film whose horror lies mainly in the warnings that are not heeded instead of in the mask that represents the titular onibaba. Ending with wanting the viewer to retrospect on how ironic it is to hear the words "I'm a human being" from someone who has done nothing but monstrous things