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  • GoodFellas

    GoodFellas

    ★★★★½

    Short version; this is still great. 
    Yes this has been copied many times since, but for me, that only shaved off a tiny bit of enjoyment. To see Joe Pesci’s bravura performance, all energy and menace is to remember how good Pesci really was, even though he later did many pale imitations of this. In Goodfellas we have one of great screen villains, totally unredeemable. 

    After the magisterial Godfather, Scorsese knew that in 1990 audiences were ready for a different…

  • Tartuffe

    Tartuffe

    ★★★½

    Continuing the Murnau collection on Kanopy, we have his energetic and polished take on Moliere’s classic play. 

    Murnau simplifies the play’s plot significantly, focusing only on the three main characters; “religious” villain Tartuffe, hoodwinked husband Orgon and Madame Oregon’s increasingly desperate attempts to catch Tartuffe and restore the love of her husband. He keeps the action moving as this runs barely over an hour. 

    This is true even though he indulges in the tradition of having a framing device. 2…

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  • Zodiac

    Zodiac

    ★★★★½

    This my 100th Review here on Letterboxd 


    So I thought I would pause my somewhat random exploration of silent movies for something that was essentially guaranteed to be good. 

    It is interesting to compare this to the serial killer genre of the 90s ( which Fincher memorably contributed to.) With the distance of a few years Fincher sees a new way of looking at the themes and story beats involved. 

    I think it is also fascinating to think of this…

  • Nosferatu

    Nosferatu

    ★★★★½

    A Symphony of Creepiness...


    For a German silent Dracula movie, this is practically perfect in every way. 
    Our Count here is not a Hollywood debonair villain, but an almost Alien monster who certainly looks as if he hasn’t seen sunlight in hundreds of years. (Death by sunlight was one of Murnau’s innovations not present in the book)

    Schreck is perfect in the role of Count Orlok, but he is not the only interesting thing here. Murnau makes sure there is…