Favorite films

  • The French Dispatch
  • No Time to Die
  • Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy
  • The Card Counter

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  • The Northman

    ★★★

  • Queen & Slim

    ★½

  • Everything Everywhere All at Once

    ★★½

  • 2012

    ★½

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  • The Northman

    The Northman

    ★★★

    More calls to action in the script than in the filming of it. One could see how this could be taken advantage of -- in a way, demonstrating the paradox of fate, that, like truth, all cannot be said about it, meaning that choice in the matters of fate cannot be based on contingent knowns but rather indirectly on and through necessary acts. More stories ought to have oracles, I maintain, but if and only if the fate that they…

  • Queen & Slim

    Queen & Slim

    ★½

    The central montage between a sex sequence and a becoming-violent protest indicates two things, with each event in the cross-cut relationship saying something about the whole relationship and not just its counterpoint: 1) the political exigency of resistance finding consummation in pleasure and authentic affect, but 2) the check on the possibility of victims getting to enjoy, that an act of love can't stick out and instead must be subsumed under utility. Ironically, this isn't like Bonnie & Clyde one bit since it removes impotency (and its excesses) from the picture in all arenas.

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  • Nathan for You: Finding Frances

    Nathan for You: Finding Frances

    Maci, a hired escort: It's kinda weird having cameras around, right?
    Nathan Fielder: We could turn them off if you want.
    M: laughs Could we?
    NF: Do you want to?
    M: Does that defeat the purpose?
    NF: What's the purpose?
    M: You're filming something. It's kinda the purpose, right?
    ...
    NF: We do have this drone. It'd be cool to get a drone shot, maybe.

    Nathan Fielder's just fucking brilliant TV show has always been built around the similitudes between…

  • Sicario

    Sicario

    There are a few things you will see many crime thrillers have in common. Among them are the ominous aerial shots, night-vision photography, and scenes operating with only a single limited light source. Denis Villeneuve no doubt uses all three of these, but it is the subtle impressionist inflections he adds to them which sets this film far apart. I am going to focus on his aerial shots for two reasons: One, they especially stand out for their exceptional ability…