chazbo

chazbo Pro

I like to watch.

Favorite films

  • Stalker
  • PlayTime
  • Pather Panchali
  • The Face of Another

Recent activity

All
  • The Road

    ★★½

  • Mr. Turner

    ★★★★

  • Cure

    ★★★★

  • The Batman

    ★★½

Recent reviews

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  • The Road

    The Road

    ★★½

    I’ve avoided this adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road for years, mainly because of my love for the book and having heard some rather unenthusiastic opinions on the movie. But having recently re-read the novel, I decided to take the plunge.

    Some people remark how bleak the movie is. But to me it’s really not bleak enough. McCarthy’s postapocalyptic world is relentlessly unforgiving, unsettling, and dark. Take the most desolate and disaster-wracked place imaginable, infuse it with an overbearing sense…

  • Mr. Turner

    Mr. Turner

    ★★★★

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    Fans of Mike Leigh’s work, including me, often prefer his contemporary working-class films over his period pieces. There’s something rawer and more resonant in the cutting realism of the former than in the stylized recreations of the latter. But recently watching Topsy-Turvy and Mr. Turner on back-to-back nights gave me a new appreciation for both films, and a strong preference for Mr. Turner as the better of the two.

    Like the light comic operas of Gilbert and Sullivan, Topsy-Turvy is…

Popular reviews

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  • Manufractur

    Manufractur

    ★★★★

    Manufraktur begins and ends with hands (manus). Juxtaposing hands and automobiles, Tscherkassky suggests the production of speed and fracturing of time and space. Hands, or industry, create and operate the machines that have historically altered the subject's relationship with time and space. A world in motion is fragmented, blurred, torn apart and reassembled in disorienting ways. Tscherkassky turns this fragmentation back on industry by taking found commercial footage and distorting its representativeness.

    Hands also manufacture film. Cinema has also historically…

  • Richard III

    Richard III

    ★★★★★

    Richard III is Laurence Olivier's (ahem) crowning achievement as a producer and director of Shakespeare on film. Despite the reputation of Henry V as wartime propaganda (which is true but has also given many an easy way to unfairly dismiss it), the film is really an argument for translating Shakespearean theater to cinema. Hamlet allows Olivier to explore cinematic technique even further by incorporating elements of film noir, German Expressionism, and Universal horror into the sets and cinematography. Yet, in…