Evan Popplestone

Cult, sci-fi, horror, thriller, noir, grindhouse, arthouse and world cinema.

Favorite films

  • Blade Runner
  • Do the Right Thing
  • Love Exposure
  • This Is Spinal Tap

Recent activity

All
  • Hiroshima Mon Amour

    ★★★★½

  • My Life as a Zucchini

    ★★★★

  • The Love Witch

    ★★★

  • The Worst Person in the World

    ★★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Hiroshima Mon Amour

    Hiroshima Mon Amour

    ★★★★½

    "I felt the heat on Peace Square. Ten thousand degrees, on Peace Square. That I know. The temperature of the sun, on Peace Square. How could one ignore it?"

    Alain Resnais's first feature film is a French Nouvelle Vague classic. His background as a director of documentaries shows through in the candid, cinema verite styling of many scenes. At the same time, there's an undeniable sense of innovation in the non-linear editing, poetic dialogue, retrospective storytelling and unconventional way in…

  • My Life as a Zucchini

    My Life as a Zucchini

    ★★★★

    This Swiss/French stop-motion feature is an engaging, subtly emotive effort about a young boy who accidentally kills his alcoholic mother and is moved into a foster home with several other children, all of whom come from similarly sad family backgrounds.

    The visuals are simple but charming. However, it's the sense of characterisation that makes this one work so well; these kids are believable not only as kids, but also as well-rounded human beings.

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  • The Northman

    The Northman

    ★★★★★

    An ancient poem of primal brutality, written in blood, mud, water, fire and internal organs. In the howl of the dog, the peck of the crow, the black void sockets of an eyeless Björk, and in the rage-filled hearts of vengeful men.

    Violence here is not glorified - there is no true good and evil, only the choice between hating your enemies and loving your friends.

    This is what cinema is about.

  • The Worst Person in the World

    The Worst Person in the World

    ★★★★

    It took me a while to warm to this drama from Danish-Norwegian director Joachim Trier, featuring a central protagonist (Julie, played by Renate Reinsve) who comes across as being far too impulsive to be truly likeable. I can't say I was a big fan of some of the cruder humour either.

    Nonetheless, the film definitely hits some emotional payoffs as we see more of her navigating life's awkward decisions, particularly when it comes to relationships. Reinsve's acting is undeniably excellent,…