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  • Disobedience

    Disobedience

    ★★★

    If you ever mixed up Rachel Weisz and Rachel McAdams before, just wait until the scene where they wear similar wigs. Weisz is great, McAdams is good and I hardly recognized Alessandro Nivola; a thoughtful, if bland picture that occasionally lapses into sexual and religious kitsch--I expect a little more from the director of A FANTASTIC WOMAN and GLORIA.

  • Rodents of Unusual Size

    Rodents of Unusual Size

    ★★★

    Further proof that one can make a movie about *anything*--in this case, twenty-plus pound swamp rats (technical name: nutria) infesting coastal Louisiana and beyond. Fun, educational and not for the squeamish.

  • Burning

    Burning

    ★★★★½

    I like films that aren't entirely knowable, where motivations and intentions are obscured and shrouded with mystery and yet, the whole satisfies, inviting one to perceive the world differently after the credits roll. BURNING firmly falls into this category; that its intentions aren't apparent until the very last scene nearly puts it up there with MULHOLLAND DR. and CEMETERY OF SPLENDOR in the canon of slippery, unknowable cinema.

    Adapted from a Haruki Murakami short story, it focuses on a peculiar…

  • Detour

    Detour

    ★★★★

    "That's life. Whichever way you turn, Fate sticks out a foot to trip you."
    (BTW, this would make a wicked double feature with MY WINNIPEG.)

  • Shirkers

    Shirkers

    ★★★★

    As a 19-year-old student in her native Singapore, Sandi Tan wrote and starred in an independent feature film she made with her friends and her much older male mentor, but it was never finished, as said mentor absconded with the film reels and just disappeared. A quarter century later, Tan has made a documentary about the experience, complete with a good amount of footage she eventually recovered from the earlier project. Purposely disorienting and chockablock with fantastic imagery, especially when…

  • Never Goin' Back

    Never Goin' Back

    ★★★

    Less the Gen-Z GHOST WORLD it wants to be than a distaff, sillier, low-budget SUPERBAD. Upped half a notch for inspired use of a certain Michael Bolton song. Camila Morrone, however, is nearly as good as a young Scarlett Johansson.

  • Andrei Rublev

    Andrei Rublev

    ★★★★

    Tarkovsky's stab at a historical epic naturally has more poetry in it than the Hollywood equivalent; I still think his subsequent, stranger films more fluently make the case for him as one of the best filmmakers of his time.

  • Minding the Gap

    Minding the Gap

    ★★★★★

    Man, this movie... it just *wrecked* me, even though it's not a tragedy. It captures both the euphoria and turmoil (and every emotion in-between) of everyday life via three young male skateboarders in Rockford, Illinois, one of whom is the director. I've seen this kind of documentary before, but never has it felt so honest or carried as much weight this effortlessly. The cinematography and editing are both superb. It's on Hulu, so go watch it already.

  • Support the Girls

    Support the Girls

    ★★★★½

    Building on the underrated RESULTS, Andrew Bujalski's sixth feature might be his most satisfying one to date. Using a Hooter's-like restaurant called Double Whammie's as its unlikely setting, he portrays what amounts to a makeshift workplace family that comes across as genuine and nuanced as one you might've actually been a part of.

    As its matriarch/general manager Lisa, Regina Hall delivers one of the year's best performances, but the ensemble is terrific as well, especially Shayna MacHayle (a real find…

  • Love, Gilda

    Love, Gilda

    ★★★

    Gilda Radner may not have been the most original or technically accomplished comedienne, but she was unquestionably one of the most likable--as the cliche goes, she lit up whatever room she entered. Lisa D'Apolito's sympathetic documentary gets this across beautifully, making a case for Radner's accomplishments and effervescence. As an analysis, however, it's somewhat choppy, never forging as a complete or illuminating an assessment of its subject, as, say, WON'T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR did for Fred Rogers. Still, it makes the case why Radner, her life tragically cut short by ovarian cancer in 1989, should not be forgotten.

  • Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things

    Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things

    ★★★

    A philosophy I can get behind, presented in a thoughtful, if unexceptional package.

  • The Thin Man

    The Thin Man

    ★★★★½

    Nick and Nora (and Asta) Forever.