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  • The Lion King

    The Lion King

    ★★

    So Gus Van Sant does a shot-for-shot remake of Hitchcock's Psycho, and is universally derided for it; Disney does it with The Lion King, and makes eleventy billion dollars. I guess, to be fair, Van Sant did cast Vince Vaughn.

    Yes, I know, there's like 5% new or different material, but taking The Lion King from animation to "live action" has created a soulless vacuum of a movie, even more so than Aladdin or pretty much any of the other…

  • Rhapsody in August

    Rhapsody in August

    ★★★

    A movie light in story and even character, there's still something about it that made it a worthwhile enough sit through. That may sound like a low bar, as it a Kurosawa movie after all, but I think I tend to like late Kurosawa more than most seem to in general. I admit the kids can be a little annoying, but they are overall fine. The grandmother is an interesting, enigmatic character. Still weird to see Richard Gere, lol, but…

  • To All the Boys I've Loved Before

    To All the Boys I've Loved Before

    ★★★

    Another good romantic comedy, it's always nice to see more good ones, so few are being made nowadays, let alone good ones. I'm not even sure if this is more of a romantic comedy but more of a high school coming-of-age drama. However it's classified, an enjoyable light movie overall. Memorable characters help to bring it over the top.

  • Always Be My Maybe

    Always Be My Maybe

    ★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    An enjoyable romantic comedy. Has some truthful moments in between the random comedy moments most romcoms have. Still, the Keanu portion of the movie is easily the comedic highlight ("I'm sorry"). Everything he gets to say is a comedic treasure, and everyone else's reactions to him are also perfect.

  • Always Be My Maybe

    Always Be My Maybe

    ★★★½

    This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

    An enjoyable romantic comedy. Has some truthful moments in between the random comedy moments most romcoms have. Still, the Keanu portion of the movie is easily the comedic highlight ("I'm sorry"). Everything he gets to say is a comedic treasure, and everyone else's reactions to him are also perfect.

  • Never-Ending Man: Hayao Miyazaki

    Never-Ending Man: Hayao Miyazaki

    ★★★

    Now the second film documentary released as a movie that I've seen on Miyazaki (The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness being a little bit better), and after just having watched his 2013 hour and a half long retirement press conference (ha), I still can't get enough time spent hearing him talk about literally anything. Studio Ghibli shutting down was a cultural tragedy, I'm glad Miyazaki is still continuing on, hopefully he can work until he's 100. The perfect title for this would have been Hayao Miyazaki: Never Stop Never Stopping.

  • Bad Genius

    Bad Genius

    ★★★½

    Never has taking a test seemed so exciting, nor will it ever again. Perhaps a new subgenre being born, the test heist? Probably not, but it makes such a mundane setting seem exciting. Slickly filmed. On a side note, probably the first and only movie I've yet seen from Thailand.

  • The Whole Town's Talking

    The Whole Town's Talking

    ★★★★

    For years I was getting this film confused with George Stevens' The Talk of the Town, which I've already seen (with Jean Arthur in both). John Ford movies tend to vary highly in levels of quality to me, especially from some of his earlier films, so I was relieved I was able to enjoy The Whole Town's Talking a lot. An old premise today, but what was relatively a fresh and new-ish idea in it's day, the dual-role idea is…

  • The Day After

    The Day After

    ★★

    Out of the movies I've seen from the director Hong Sang-soo, it seems like he really repeats himself a lot, and I mean A LOT. There's an interesting moment or two, but much of the movie is pretty tedious. The main male character seems like a stand-in for the director, and mostly comes off as a dick, and even worse, an uninteresting dick at that. The female characters were more interesting, but unfortunately the male is mostly the main character.…

  • The Big Red One

    The Big Red One

    ★★★★

    Note: I watched the "Reconstruction version."

    Only the 2nd Samuel Fuller film I've seen (the other being Pickup on South Street), and The Big Red One hit me much stronger than the first did. One of the better war movies from the "platoon" perspective, the gold standard being to me Battleground. Some of the cast works better than others, and Lee Marvin is a great anchor. I can see Spielberg being influenced by this (along with Battleground) for Saving Private Ryan. Some very interesting scenes and moments.

  • The Far Country

    The Far Country

    ★★★½

    An interesting, better than average western, even among Stewart and Mann's. Engaging story and script, good actors and characters, and a good buildup of tensions that only gets busted up by a short and too fast ending.

  • You Were Never Really Here

    You Were Never Really Here

    ★★★★½

    What a powerful movie. Phoenix adds another amazing performance to his career, and I wish Lynne Ramsay made a lot more movies, this and her We Need To Talk About Kevin are two great movies. Brutal emotionally, and perhaps a few too many "arty" flourishes that aren't needed for the material, but there's some beautifully haunting images throughout. One of those films that I'll continue to think about every once in awhile.