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  • The City of the Dead

    The City of the Dead

    ★★★½

    Hoop-Tober 5.0: Film #3
    Criteria: Film before 1970
    UK

    City of the Dead’s setup is eerily similar to that of H.P. Lovecraft’s 1931 short story, The Shadow Over Innsmouth; A young protagonist decides to visit an old, forgotten New England town for research purposes and procures a hotel room there, only to find that said town is inhabited by deranged cultists harboring a dark secret.

    Overall, it’s a pretty cool and atmospheric little horror film, with a rather memorable and…

  • The Fall of the House of Usher

    The Fall of the House of Usher

    ★★★½

    Hooptober 5.0: Film #2
    Criteria: Silent Film, Film from before 1970
    FRANCE

    Jean Epstein’s The Fall of the House of Usher boasts some very moody and atmospheric cinematography and settings, which contributes very much to its haunting presence. Unlike most silent films, Usher opts for subtle performances and body language rather than a reliance on overacting and exaggerated expressions and movements. Beyond this, there’s some pretty impressively stylistic montage and editing work present that sets it apart from other films of the era.

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  • Hellraiser

    Hellraiser

    ★★★★

    Hoop-Tober 3.0: Film #2

    Did another quick illustration for this one! Won't be able to do this for every entry, but if I feel compelled to do it for a particular film, I will!

    nathanandersonart.tumblr.com/post/150527688454/no-tears-please-its-a-waste-of-good-suffering

    Getting the most 'fresh in my mind' rewatches out of the way first. Hellraiser is a bit frustrating to me. On one hand, it's one of the most unique franchise-starters in horror history, boasting some incredible character and creature designs, has excellent seedy atmosphere and…

  • Black Christmas

    Black Christmas

    ★★★★½

    Hoop-Tober 3.0: Film #19

    Possible spoilers abound:

    People seem to attribute Carpenter's 1978 hit Halloween to be the slasher genre's progenitor, without realizing that Black Christmas came out 4 years prior. I feel Black Christmas ultimately contributed more to the sub-genre than Halloween, while simultaneously being more inventive, intelligent and unsettling. Though Halloween's high-point is its excellent atmosphere, Black Christmas is a very sharply written and comedy-infused horror, much like Landis' incredible An American Werewolf in London. Black Christmas is…