• V for Vendetta

    V for Vendetta

    ★★½

    Reasonable filmic conversion of the graphic novel. It doesn’t really do a lot with it, but it’s fine.

  • Easy A

    Easy A

    ★★★

    Another US high-school comedy. Not a John Hughes 80s one, but one that makes explicit reference in-universe to things like The Breakfast Club. It's a pretty good example of the genre.#

  • Baby Driver

    Baby Driver

    ★★★★

    I saw this at the cinema when it came out back in 2017. Loved it then. Loved it even more now. Incredible soundtrack, amazing (daft) car chases. Crime.

  • A Room with a View

    A Room with a View

    ★★½

    It's an old Merchant-Ivory period piece. Pleasant enough, but kind of stilted in places. In part. some of that may be deliberate, to reflect the buttoned-up nature of the times, but it's hard to say.

    Amusingly, the image that's shown as I type this on Letterboxd — which may or may not be the image that accompanies the post when it reaches my blog — is from the very last scene of the film, if I'm not mistaken. An odd choice.

  • Pitch Perfect

    Pitch Perfect

    ★★★½

    Fun story about competitive acapella singers at a US university.

  • Miss Sloane

    Miss Sloane

    ★★★

    Decent story about a US lobbyist who takes on the support of a bill to restrict some tiny amount of gun rights. She quits one company and moves to a smaller one to do it.

    An absurdly fanciful ending, sadly. The sadness is in American society, not the film.

  • The Velvet Underground

    The Velvet Underground

    ★★★★

    There's a lot to like here if you're already a fan — or at least, have some interest. Probably not too much if neither of those apply.

    It has interviews with those who are still with us (or who were when it was made). Not just John Cale, Moe Tucker, Doug Yule, but members of Andy Warhol's Factory crew (the 'Superstars'), like Mary Woronov and Gerard Malanga.

    I'd like to have heard more of the songs, especially the less well-known…

  • Withnail & I

    Withnail & I

    ★★★★

    Long time since I saw this, so all I remembered really were the quotable bits ('We've gone on holiday by accident!')

    The high dinginess and run-down state of Britain as the sixties ran down is skilfully evoked. It's very male, though. The only female character is the woman in the tearoom who refuses to serve our heroes. If that's the right word.

    It's not laugh-out-loud funny, but it has aged surprisingly well.

  • 13th

    13th

    ★★★½

    A documentary about the prison-industrial complex, this is a tough watch. The title comes from the 13th amendment to the US Constitution. While abolishing slavery, that amendment also allowed for slavery to continue — at least for those incarcerated for a crime.

    Tough, as I say, but it should be seen.

  • Legally Blonde

    Legally Blonde

    ★★★

    We’ve been enjoying the more recent work of Reece Witherspoon lately, in The Morning Show and Big Little Lies, so it was interesting to go back to see her in her younger days. 

    It’s a fun enough film. There were no surprises, in post because I’ve seen the live musical, but mainly because it’s not the kind of film that offers surprises.

  • The Beatles: Get Back

    The Beatles: Get Back

    ★★★★★

    I wish I could give this six stars or seven. Hell, why not ten? Actually watching it twice in two months and giving it five stars each time is giving it ten.

    It is so, so good, in so many ways.

    Apparently Disney are releasing an IMAX version of just the rooftop concert soon. That'll be interesting, if too short. I mean, I'd watch the whole thing in a cinema with a good sound system. And I speak as one who once watched the eight-hour version of Wim Wenders's Until the End of the World at the BFI, so you know I mean it.

  • Nomadland

    Nomadland

    ★★★½

    The scenery is bleak, and the setup is sad, but in the end this movie is neither. Frances McDormand's character may have lost her home, job, and even town — she comes from a company town called Empire, which is closed down when the business fails — but she finds companionship along the road.

    Sometimes that companionship is herself: she is someone who is happy in their own company, and that's okay. She lives in her van. She's not homeless,…