RSS feed for Dhruv Krishna

Favorite films

Recent activity

All

Recent reviews

More
  • Kedarnath

    Kedarnath

    ★★

    The beauty and purity of a wonderfully captured landscape, courtesy Tushar Kanti Ray's cinematography that uses several wide-shots effectively to evoke the expansiveness of Kedarnath cries out for a better story, screenplay, dialogues, and characters. The decision, moreover, to base this clichéd and ineffectively developed love-story as a backdrop to the 2013 Uttrakhand floods feels terribly misjudged because the impending natural disaster in the film is, in any case, a mere dramatic construction to represent the cry of lovers separated…

  • Happy as Lazzaro

    Happy as Lazzaro

    ★★★★

    A beguiling, and ambitious film that begins like a semi-realist tale on the complex hierarchal levels of exploitation that exist in society, with the kindest and most innocent, Lazzaro (played wonderfully by the wide-eyed Adriano Tardiolo), occupying the lowerest strata from which it almost seems impossible for him to escape. But, the lovely transformation of the film halfway through its running time into something resembling more closely a magical tale helps director Alice Rohrwacher extend both the narrative and the…

Popular reviews

More
  • The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

    The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

    ★★★★★

    NYFF #11

    A rip-roaring comedy of horrors in which the madly inventive Coen Bros. use the Wild Wild West, and the anthology format as a playground to perform their own ballad of mixing as many styles of comedy (broad, slapstick, absurdist, zany, screwball, and black) with the tragic erosion of a genre, and especially, of the people who occupy it. With the help of Carter Burwell's rich, and majestic score, and Bruno Delbonnel's exquisite cinematography, the Coens evoke these different…

  • Veere Di Wedding

    Veere Di Wedding

    ★½

    One of the very few engaging scenes in Shashanka Ghosh’s “Veere Di Wedding” takes place during the beginning of the film’s second half in which the four friends (the titular veeres) confront each other about the vanity of their problems. This sequence is the only time in this otherwise extremely fake film that the friends actually call out each other for their stupidities, which the never-ending first hour of the film has been shoving right in the audiences’ faces. I…