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  • The Americanization of Emily

    The Americanization of Emily

    ★★★★

    "It's not war that's insane, you see. It's the morality of it. It's not greed or ambition that makes war: it's goodness. Wars are always fought for the best of reasons: for liberation or manifest destiny. Always against tyranny and always in the interest of humanity. So far this war, we've managed to butcher some ten million humans in the interest of humanity. Next war it seems we'll have to destroy all of man in order to preserve his damn dignity."

    Only Paddy Chayefsky would have written something this pointed, biting, and powerful.

  • Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance

    Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance

    ★★★½

    It assumes a little too much knowledge on the part of the viewer regarding character introductions and some plot points, but I have to give full credit to any film that can setup parallel revenge narratives this effortlessly, make them look this appealing, and then turn the tables to reveal them as abhorrent as they are.

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  • Boyhood

    Boyhood

    ★★

    I'm this far behind (two weeks) logging films at Letterboxd, because of Boyhood. I've spent over a week reading positive and negative reviews, trying to pinpoint exactly why the film failed to completely work for me. I liked parts of it - mostly the parts when Mason was a child; but as a whole the film failed to engage me, and I never cared about any of the characters.

    Naturally, I am surprised at my lack of enthusiasm for Boyhood,…

  • Frances Ha

    Frances Ha

    ★★★★★

    "What do you do? It's such a stupid question. I thought I'd ask it."
    ...
    "What do you do?"
    "That's such a stupid question. Just kidding. Um, it's kinda hard to explain."
    "Because what you do is complicated?"
    "Uh, because I don't really do it."

    I can't help it; I adore this film. There's no other film I've seen that depicts the challenges of a young artist adjusting to living on their own as hilariously, poignantly, and accurately as Frances…