Yi Yi ★★★★½

I daresay A Brighter Summer Day may attract more plaudits for director Edward Yang, but this three-hour family drama is its own perfectly-satisfying work, channelling something of the quiet reflectiveness of an Ozu film without being hackneyed. In fact, there are a number of themes that could easily have been executed in a heavy-handed manner (not least this idea of the kid taking photos of the back of people's heads) but which seem integrated into the film's structure, which generally seems to prefer little scenes that don't immediately connect up with one another but build into a patchwork that pays dividends by the final third. Yang's camera often frames scenes via reflections, giving these dense deep frames through glass, reflecting both the outside world and the interior dramas scarcely contained within them, which is why when those dramas do exceed the frame in a rather bloody way near the end it seems so surprising (and maybe even a little unnecessary). That aside, the emotional arcs of the three main characters -- dad NJ, frustrated by corporate greed at his workplace, and his children Ting-Ting and Yang-Yang, each dealing with their own alienating circumstances -- are all handled with aplomb and move towards a satisfying conclusion.