RSS feed for FanOfWords

Favorite films

Recent activity

All

Recent reviews

More
  • Black Panther

    Black Panther

    Never before in a blockbuster have so many black actors been assembled. That said, Black Panther does not rock the boat when it comes to storytelling – it follows the pattern laid down in countless Marvel films. Filmed during the first year of Donald Trump's presidency, it is impossible not to recognise the political overtones; refugees are decried, governmental heads command respect - despite their inexperience - and we even hear of foreign nations meddling in order to destabilise democracies.

  • The Two Jakes

    The Two Jakes

    Surprisingly good sequel to Chinatown which, though falling some distance short of its predecessor, stands up as a tidy little detective film all the same. Jack Nicholson not only reprises the role of J.J. Gittes, but takes over directing duties from Roman Polanski. Robert Towne's screenplay adds an unnecessary and incongruous voice-over, notably absent from the original, but the period detail – from the cars to the costumes – is spot on. A box office failure, it is deserving of reappraisal.

Popular reviews

More
  • Son of Saul

    Son of Saul

    Shot in tight close-ups using shallow focus, with traditional widescreen aspect ratio sliced down to a much more compact 4:3, Son of Saul is unsparing of the horrors of Auschwitz without indulging in salacious detail. Glimpses of the recently murdered are always at the corners of frames, the minutiae of concentration camp life – the disposal of ashes, the scrubbing of floors – rendered unremarkable. Among the few Holocaust films to deal not only with the ordeal of the Jews, but with their faith.

  • O.J.: Made in America

    O.J.: Made in America

    Had O.J.: Made in America been a two-hour documentary, it might well have stood as one of the best films of 2016. At almost four times that length, director Ezra Edelman has created an exhaustive – and exhausting – work that is, frankly, indispensable. Edelman delves into Simpson's unprecedented story – a black athlete distancing himself from the rhetoric of solidarity espoused by the likes of Muhammad Ali, only to exploit the very real grievances of poor black America in order to evade justice.