Ranked #5: John Frankenheimer

Frankenheimer’s greatest films are stories revolving around radical personal destitution in which the characters are reduced to the bare essential of their mere reactive existence with no more purpose than engaging in extreme dangerous activities; it’s not by accident that he is one of the first great (and unfortunatly often forgotten) modern action directors with a particulr interest in a very archetypical form of action hero: the “emptied” anonimous outcast who reactes energically to extremely dangerous situations (The Train is quite a landmark in that respect). Even psychological “individuation” is in itself a form of imprisonment (Seconds, his most accomplished masterpiece, is all about that). I think Robert Ryan’s Larry Slade is just the ultimate incarnation of this type of existential outcast Frankenheimer was so fond of: in this case, a tired old ex-anarchist whose very disilusion might be paradoxically the utmost pipe dream of a ‘foolosopher’ ghastly scapegoated in the end, but not at all redeemed.

More: videodromecomments.wordpress.com/2015/05/26/iceman-cometh/

  • Seconds

    1

  • The Iceman Cometh

    2

  • The Train

    3

  • French Connection II

    4

  • The Gypsy Moths

    5

  • Ronin

    6

  • The Manchurian Candidate

    7

  • Seven Days in May

    8

  • 52 Pick-Up

    9

  • Black Sunday

    10

  • Grand Prix

    11

  • I Walk the Line

    12

  • The Holcroft Covenant

    13

  • Dead Bang

    14

  • Against the Wall

    15

  • The Fourth War

    16

  • Prophecy

    17

  • Birdman of Alcatraz

    18

  • The Hire: Ambush

    19

  • Reindeer Games

    20

  • The Challenge

    21

  • The Young Savages

    22

  • Year of the Gun

    23

  • The Fixer

    24

  • The Island of Dr. Moreau

    25

  • George Wallace

    26