Festiville

Festival coverage, lists and news from the Letterboxd crew.
Art from David Cronenberg’s Crimes of the Future, part of the 75th annual Festival de Cannes lineup (May 17—28, 2022).

Stories

Cannes 2022 In Conversation

Letterboxd correspondents Ella Kemp and Isaac Feldberg take a breath between screenings to share their Cannes experiences and demystify the standing ovation.  

Ten Things We're Excited for at Cannes 2022

Whether you’re one of the lucky few hitting the Croisette for the most glamorous festival of the year, or perusing all of the hot takes coming fresh out of each screening from your couch at home, there’s nothing quite like the feverish thrill of the Cannes Film Festival. With today’s announcement of the 2022 selection, we take a look at ten things we’re most excited for. 

Liked reviews

Nanny

Nanny

★★★★★

A gorgeously directed and beautifully written film about an immigrant Nanny finding the power to take back her life. The drive of the movie is watching Aisha, the main character trying to bring her son to America from Senegal. We watch as her job slowly takes up her entire life but she never, EVER, loses sight of her mission. It’s such a beautiful story because it’s so often that immigrant mothers move to America to live the “American Dream”, working…

After Yang

After Yang

★★★★

There’s a lingering effect happening here that I’m calling “After After Yang.” Kogonada opened a door to some of my most repressed fears in a way that has left me feeling curious, patient, and in this moment, a little less afraid.

Attica

Attica

★★★★

This is a stellar tell-most study. It would be nice if the reporting and editing here got some awards love.

Naturally the recollections and footage alike are disquieting and sometimes harrowing. But the arc of the slow, mostly fruitless attempts at progress and real rehabilitation is so gripping that this is a quite easy watch for me.

There's material for more hours, I'm sure, but the firm two hours makes it leave packing a punch given what's contained in the…

Attica

Attica

★★★★

Attica is a gut wrenching examination of the uprising at Attica Prison and the massacre committed by law enforcement. It only happened fifty years ago.

I don’t normally give trigger warnings but the last half hour of this is horrific. It’s hell on earth. It reminded me of footage I’ve seen from the concentration camps from World War II. Yet this happened here in the supposed land of the free. It didn’t happen during a war or in formerly confederate…

Julia

Julia

★★★★

This documentary is an absolute delight. Her story is already pretty interesting and they do a great job of covering most of the important details in what felt like a very comprehensive package (I knew very little about Julia going into this). It was also great (and extremely hunger-inducing) how they intercut modern footage using extreme closeups of delicious looking food from her recipes in slow motion with the older footage.

The real surprise here was how unexpectedly funny Julia…

Julia

Julia

★★★½

Scad Fest #1


Did not expect one of the most moving scenes of 2021 to be Julia Child taking a pan off its hanger

A concentrated dose of wholesome food porn

The Rescue

The Rescue

★★★★½

I loved Free Solo so much it basically reinvigorated my interest in documentaries, so it's no surprise that I loved The Rescue, in which directors Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin deliver 114 minutes of PURE STRESS as they chronicle the Thai cave rescue from 2018. Unlike Free Solo and Meru, however, they weren't shooting the action as it occurred, but a treasure trove of footage from inside the cave combined with skillfully integrated reenactments—by the real-life participants—presumably shot by…