• auburn715

    ★★

    Pretty great movie that has a lot of laughs but gets ruined by the ending with the sub plot of the main character being a pedophile. 

    I love Spike Lee but COME ON MAN

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  • Zev Burrows

    ★★★

    Plays out more like a sermon than a film (though that might be entirely intentional), and the last half hour is a disaster. The strongest things about it are Clarke Peters' performance as a preacher grandfather who feels disconnected from his reclusive and tech-savvy grandson, and the song sequences in the church, which showcase Lee's gift for building momentum through music. There are themes (such as that of gentrification) that he better explores in other better films, and I would hesitate to recommend it to those that aren't fans of the director.

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  • CaseyKelderman

    ★★

    I admire Spike Lee going back to his roots for this low budget film shot over a few weeks in NY. The acting and writing is really strong, and with a higher budget could have been elevated. BUT a twist 90 minutes in detracts from what was built and what pays off by the end of the film.

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  • Bajo

    ★½

    I lost all hope for this movie at the 28 minute mark, which was the point when I realized that neither the acting or cinematography was going to be redeemed, let alone the rote conversations or uncompelling plot.

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  • owentorrance

    ★★

    iPads should be banned from ever appearing in films.

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  • Mike Cuenca

    ★★★

    I think the digital here is excellent with heavy saturated eye-popping colors. Very impressive.

    The child actors are pretty weak unfortunately. And I’m always curious about filmmakers who have budgets, who have access to this gigantic portal packed with talent they can afford, yet still make terrible casting choices. Aware that Lee wanted non-professionals, which is great, but these kids still have to be able to balance the flick. Clarke Peters does all the lifting.

    Love that it was practically done guerrilla. Love tonal shifts, not sure how I feel about it here.

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  • BK777

    ★★★★

    So I’m not going to call it a “film challenge” because the word challenge should be used for something that’s difficult, and this month of watching only “black cinema” has not been difficult in the least. I’m so happy to really be digging into the films of Spike Lee finally. Going into this month I had only seen five of his films and now I’m torn between feeling ashamed of not digging in sooner and excited for having so much to look forward to.

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  • Cinema Seth

    ★★★

    Not my favorite spike lee film, but I didn’t mind it.

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  • AmySeager

    I have no idea how the fuck to rate this, so I'm just not gonna. The twist in this is just insane, it warps everything around it like a black hole. It's just, an incredibly intense thing to introduce in your third act, and yet the film is SO casual about it. It's a nuclear bomb delivered like a casual 'hello'.

    It creates so many implications that the film doesn't even begin to explore.

    Was that the point??? Or was it just an incredibly tone-deaf decision? Or is this meant to be some sort of larger than life Sirkian melodrama? I honestly have no idea.

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  • ComicSolution54

    ★★★½

    What a weird movie...

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  • spoilerfrees

    www.spoilerfreereviews.com/post/red-hook-summer?utm_source=letterboxd&utm_medium=letterboxd&utm_campaign=letterboxd

    RED HOOK SUMMER Is not only the worst flick of 2012, it’s also the worst film Spike Lee has made.

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  • VaguePains

    ★★★

    Spike Lee isn't afraid to break the rules of movie-making to drive his point home. I love that, and ironically the rule breaking usually makes the movie even better (like the end of BlacKkKlansman, when actual footage of recent racist violence interrupts the tidy ending of the story).

    That rule breaking is taken to an extreme in Red Hook Summer. Apparently Lee self financed the movie, bought a camera, shot the thing in 18 days "guerrilla-style," and sought out kids…

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