Film at Lincoln Center

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For over 50 years, Film at Lincoln Center has been dedicated to supporting the art and elevating the craft of cinema and enriching film culture. The New York…

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The debut feature by Sky Hopinka (a Ho-Chunk Nation national and a descendent of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians), extends the seductive, multisensory experience of the artist’s acclaimed short films into a double portrait of two of Hopinka’s friends, Sweetwater Sahme and Jordan Mercier. As they meditate on life, death, and rebirth, Hopinka drifts alongside them through the rich natural, mythological, and historical landscapes of the Pacific Northwest, and locates a distinctive form of poetic documentary that is as…

Master filmmaker Ignacio Agüero continues his series of intimate, Chris Marker–like cine-essays with this chronicle of the neighborhood in Santiago, Chile, where he has lived for more than half a century. Quietly mixing observational street photography with ad hoc interviews with friends and neighbors, the filmmaker locates the forgotten microhistories of the buildings, businesses, and people in this small corner of the world, while also meditating on the shadowy legacy of Chile’s military dictatorship. What emerges is a sense of…

Oda’s sophomore feature trains its focus on the titular natural sinkholes, found in the northern regions of the Yucatan Peninsula, which served as sources of water for inland Mayans and took on a mystical aspect as thresholds between mortal life and the beyond. Oda’s Super 8mm camera immerses us in these sinkholes, locating a subterranean world of shadow and luminescence, an aquatic soundscape, and the immaterial reverberations of lost histories and forgotten memories swirling out of human sight only to…

An investigation into individual and collective amnesia, Morgan Quaintaince’s film draws from stories of alien abductions, hypnosis, and decolonization to map the role of forgetting in the production of the self.

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Liked reviews

This review may contain spoilers. I can handle the truth.

***this is a review of the DIRECTOR'S CUT of Midsommar, and a detailed breakdown of the new footage after the jump***

On July 3, Ari Aster’s “Midsommar” was released on 2,700 screens across the United States. The twisted modern fairy tale —an epic fable that starts with a bleak murder-suicide, and ends with a somewhat brighter one almost 147 minutes later — was an extraordinary ask for a multiplex audience, and Aster knew full well how fortunate he was that…

How refreshing. Denis’s dense and fully fleshed-out conversations, confrontations and intimate moments are such a joy to watch and stick with you. She’s always good.

Zama

Zama

★★★★½

Colonialism Roleplay ASMR - Must Watch Till End!

the first word we hear in ZAMA is "voyeur," an accusation laid against the title character by a group of women he watches bathe on the beach. zama flees as a woman pursues him, only to turn around and strike her down. it is this inciting incident that frames the rest of the film and its perspective on colonialism: not as violence against women persay, but as voyeurism. the indigenous population and…

Zama

Zama

★★★★½

Colonialism as a closed loop. The faces of the generals and the enemies change but the names seem to stay the same, all the while the once proud official slowly deteriorates, his clothes rotting and his mind melting. Martel's rapturous compositions manage to feel cramped even at their most expansive, using intersecting planar blocking to add to the general sense of confusion, of not knowing where to look or what to do. The last third, which leaps ludicrously far away from the preceding material, somehow sharpens the entire feature, bringing its nightmarish logic into crystalline focus.