Favorite films

  • Superman
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
  • Heathers

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  • Censor

    ★★★★

  • Till Death

    ★★★

  • Last Action Hero

    ★★★½

  • Killing Dad (Or How to Love Your Mother)

    ★★★

Recent reviews

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  • Censor

    Censor

    ★★★★

    The psychoactive implications of a career at the BBFC play out to disquieting and bloody effect in this mysterious, nerd-pleasing love letter of a horror film. Worlds collide as the movies-within-a-movie on square, poorly-tracked VHS contrast with the lush wide screen of what passes for the film's 'real' world. Eighties nostalgia takes the form of a queasy, Argento-esque red-and-green neon haze and an eye for video-store period detail. The giallo stylings and knowingly counterfeit premise can't help but recall Peter…

  • Till Death

    Till Death

    ★★★

    Megan Fox stirs up a movie-carrying mix of emotional damage and steely resolve as Emma, an apparently polished and successful woman with spectacularly unfortunate taste in men. But just when she thinks her love life can't get any worse, she finds herself handcuffed to a dead body. In the early scenes she's shot in mirrors, literally reflecting on her tangled web of relationships. Alongside sleek, stalker-ish camerawork there's the glossy, expensive sheen of a nineties erotic thriller; you're almost scared…

Popular reviews

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  • Fear Street: 1978

    Fear Street: 1978

    ★★★

    Netflix's meticulously derivative horror series morphs into a sort of belated Friday the 13th sequel for this instalment. Where Part One boasted a garish colour scheme and wore its very 90s self-awareness right on its plaid shirt sleeve, Part Two is all pastels and beams of summery half-light that match the sylvan setting. The characters seem to belong to a more innocent time, too, where the biggest danger they can imagine is not the unseen diabolical intelligence haunting the unfortunate…

  • The Invisible Man

    The Invisible Man

    ★★★★

    Terrifically tense thriller about a woman trying desperately to escape from an abusive relationship. The actual invisibility gimmick is almost incidental to the heroine's predicament, yet everything about the film is designed to drag every audience member's bottom to the edge of their seat and keep it there. Elisabeth Moss throws herself into the physical and emotional demands of playing the victim, unafraid to suggest the brittle paranoia that makes her an uncommonly interesting one, and retaining our sympathy without crude ingratiation. She is brilliant, and this is a superbly balanced, expertly executed nail-biter.