Brandon Wilson

Cinephile; luftmensch; dad; husband; progressive; agnostic; filmmaker; UCLA '94, MFA '99.

Favorite films

  • Beau Travail
  • Killer of Sheep
  • All That Jazz
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey

Recent activity

All
  • The Fabelmans

    ★★★★½

  • The Legend of Billie Jean

    ★★★★

  • Pearl

    ★★½

  • Broken Embraces

    ★★★½

Recent reviews

More
  • The Fabelmans

    The Fabelmans

    ★★★★½

    I think we’re all going to have to live with this one a while before we really know how good it is. The cast are all pretty exquisite and the script benefits from the kind of real life human strangeness that no writer’s imagination can match (like Sam Fabelman’s Jesus freak but boy crazy high school girlfriend). We’ve seen a lot of these kinds of films in the last 10 years and Spielberg deserves credit for not trying to outdo…

  • The Legend of Billie Jean

    The Legend of Billie Jean

    ★★★★

    This film deserves a cult following but it probably didn’t get one because it centers a young woman. Taking a 50s/60s youth rebellion plot with a clear debt to 70s New Hollywood and updating it for the 1980s, The Legend of Billie Jean absolutely nails the delicate balance between camp and naturalism, with the admirable efficiency of a genre movie done well. Taking on patriarchy, class, and 80s commercialism, Matthew Robbins tells a story of a young woman who stands…

Popular reviews

More
  • Everything Everywhere All at Once

    Everything Everywhere All at Once

    ★★

    Look. I get it. It’s been a hard two years and we all need our feel good. Sure. And I am very very very happy for Michelle Yeoh (who should have been an American megastar 20 years ago), the comeback of Ke Huy Quan, seeing James Hong finally get his figurative flowers (and literal star on the Walk of Fame), seeing Jamie Lee Curtis have fun and be the monster for a change, and Stephanie Hsu is major discovery…but this…

  • The Last Black Man in San Francisco

    The Last Black Man in San Francisco

    ★★

    Beasts of the Northern Wild. Aims to be an elegy for San Francisco but felt to me like a hairshirt for guilty gentrifiers. It almost came off as apologia for gentrification since the main characters Quixotic quest is so absurd the gentrifiers seem sober and sensible by comparison. The main character’s backstory, a compendium of Black dysfunction and downward mobility may be based in truth but it felt like misery porn. His suffering makes him “authentic” and “real” but when…