Ferguson: A Report From Occupied Territory ★★½

"For example one teacher said that she felt that Darren Wilson wasn't wrong, that she felt that he should've shot him."
"And that's what she said?"
"Yeah."
"Verbatim?"
"Yeah."
"What was the first thing y'all said in regards to how she felt?"
"My exact words were, 'Man did you hear what she just said? She must be crazy.' Those were my exact words. Like, when she said it, I couldn't believe it like, i- it all saw makin' me feel like, makin' me wanna stay more distant from those teachers. Like, we can't really relate so, how can you sit there and talk to me, like, I don't understand."

"If they catch us, we don't know what could happen. We could be the next Mike Brown, for real. They wonder why we just take off running. It's not that we doin' anything bad, we scared to be around them. If they see young black kids, trouble, that's what they think right off the bat, trouble."

"Black folk are seen and thought to be innately criminal. Innately terrifying. More powerful, more strong, beastly. Which is why you can have a recording of Darren Wilson referencing Mike Brown as something other than human, as an 'it'. And if that perception is guiding our engagements with folk, the biggest problem is not about the use of weapons alone, as in physical weapons, but as in the ideological weapons we need to rage war against."

So I went in this documentary expecting to get pissed off. At the bias. Because if there's anything I've learned about the Black Lives Matter movement over the past several months, it's that the cases of police brutality they base the foundations of their cause on are horseshit. Case in point, Michael Brown. It doesn't take long to debunk the whole, "He was an angel who did no wrong to the officer or to anybody," theory. A video here, a video there, and you realize that the officer was in fact within his legal and logical rights to shoot that guy. But no matter. Once it made headlines by the biased sack of shit news media that chose to spin the story in the most racially-motivated way possible (as they continue to do to this day), the riots began.

Justice for Brown. Hands up, don't shoot (a situation that didn't happen at all, so even that is built upon a lie). So let's also loot and burn down some buildings while we're at it. The court house? The police station? No, that's too dangerous, let's take out the easy targets.

The riots were bullshit, and anyone who loots stores that had nothing to do with the events are sacks of shit, I don't care if they're crackers or niggers.

And of course the documentary didn't cover any of that. Because the poor suffering black community has to be held in a shining light. It's bullshit manipulation.

That being said, the documentary did go into a direction of understanding that I wasn't expecting. Because the black community in Ferguson was (is) poor, the black community in Ferguson was (is) suffering. But it's not because police are discriminately killing black people left and right because their racist emotions got the better of them. Oh no, it's more logical than that, though no less anger-inducing. The city of Ferguson (and a portion of the city of St. Louis from what I understand) initially had a housing plan that developed in the 60s. Long story short, it fell through, and the city began doing horribly financially. And what's the best way to generate income for the city if there is a sector of Missouri that isn't offering a source of income due to failed businesses and minimum wage housing where the black community lives paycheck to paycheck (how and why the housing plan initially failed is left out of the documentary)? By ticketing the shit out of them. Get police to patrol areas and target low-wage earners for citations and ticketing, at which point they will go to court, where they can't afford a lawyer, and they will most likely plead guilty to it, and they will be stuck having to pay off the fine, which is anything but cheap for them. Add onto that fact that there are more tickets that citizens living in the city, and you've got yourself a very bad state of affairs. But it got the city the money income it was looking for to keep itself going. And to make sure the process got more effective, they would hire more and more police officers.

"You need so many police officers that you start getting to a point where the quality of those police officers I think is being compromised, to say the least."

This explains perfectly why there is such disdain between the black community and the police force. So why isn't this in the news more often? Because it targets the higher ups? Top officials? Well if there's any good that came out of this, it's that ever since the riots and protests, despite how misdirected they were, something happened as a result of this.

"On March 4 [2015], the U.S. Department of Justice issued a scathing report of the Ferguson Police Department. It confirmed that officers violated constitutional rights by disproportionately targeting African-Americans and exploiting them as sources of revenue."

As a result, the mayor and the police chief and a few others stepped down from their positions. Now one can only hope that progress will be made. But to be honest, I'm not entirely sure how. What is an honest and legal alternative mean for the city to generate income and not go bankrupt? Is progress being made towards such a goal? I don't know. I'm not an expert on the subject, and I just don't know. What I do know is that, if there's to be protesting, it would go a lot better if they picked their spots and methods for protesting more logically. Such as in front of the court house where they are given their fines to pay, or in front of the police station where the cops are at who hand out these tickets, or at the mayor's office.

There is an injustice being done in similar towns with similar black communities, but this isn't a nationwide epidemic as far as racism is concerned. Believe me, if they could pull this off on a white community, or dare I say a mixed community, they would. And they do. Because I've lived in and been to such communities. It's nothing new for the police force to seek out giving tickets to citizens, because that generates their paycheck and is what keeps the courts going and generates revenue for the city. There needs to be a better way than that. This is something to focus on, on a city by city basis. So why can't something like that be the focus of the media as opposed to this racially/viewership-motivated cherry-picking those fuckers do?

Michael Brown, Black Lives Matter, Hand up Don't shoot, those are built on lies. The anger built from mistreatment by the police and the city government is not. Can we find some common ground here?