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  • Kicking and Screaming

    Kicking and Screaming

    Maybe my expectations were too high based on its cult status and some of what Baumbach has done since. This just didn't do a lot for me. It felt like Baumbach saw Metropolitan, was taken with Chris Eigeman's acerbic and ultra-'90s ennui (understandable), and decided to try his own version.

    I can see how this could have felt fresh in 1995, and maybe it suffers by comparison to all that's come since. But I also just don't think it's aged…

  • The Dig

    The Dig

    This is pretty much the exact type of film that I love and that inevitably gets widely accused of being "boring" on Letterboxd.

    Sure, it's firmly middle-brow and no, not everything about it works. (For as much as I like Johnny Flynn and Lily James, their subplot does feel a bit oddly shoehorned in.) But I found it totally engaging. And I love any film that has the confidence to be about a traditionally "dull" topic and revel in its…

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  • Mud

    Mud

    ★★★★½

    You may not think you need another small-town America coming-of-age indie, but believe me, you definitely need Mud.

    This hazy drama tells the story of two 14-year-old boys, Ellis and Neckbone (Tye Sheridan and Jacob Lofland) who live in an Arkansas fishing community. One day, they stumble on the mysterious, alluring Mud (Matthew McConaughey) and inadvertently get tied up with his shady past by agreeing to help Mud get in touch with the girl he loves (Reece Witherspoon).

    The plot…

  • Talk Radio

    Talk Radio

    ★★★★½

    Watching Talk Radio in 2017 is a weird experience. The film should feel hopelessly dated, what with even its basic plot details, as well as its references to “topical” things like Vietnam and Ted Bundy. It should feel like a relic of the ‘80s. A cinematic window into a half-forgotten past. But instead, for better or worse, Oliver Stone crafted something that still feels eerily relevant nearly 30 years after its release.

    The film follows Barry Champlain, a Dallas-based talk…