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  • Death Proof

    Death Proof

    Needless to say Tarantino is not a method director, and there’s a reason he and, say, Daniel Day-Lewis have never collaborated. The behind-the-scenes features make it clear that everyone on set was having a blast and no one was taking any of it especially seriously. Death Proof at times feels like “The Treachery of Images” in slasher format: Ce n’est pas une poursuite en voiture, “this is not a car chase.” Except it is a car chase. What those bands of…

  • Death Bed: The Bed That Eats

    Death Bed: The Bed That Eats

    Death Bed is a film, as Oswalt notes, that lacks any substantive contribution to the canon of horror cinema other than being cannon-fodder for ridicule. His bit revolves around how the movie’s very existence serves as a kind of motivational tool to keep him writing, because nothing…absolutely nothing(!) he could ever conjure up could be worse than this. And maybe that’s true. Maybe it isn’t. Maybe what makes a film like this talked about (still!) after not even having an official release for 30 years. It’s a sad fact, then, that nothing about it works when it very well could have!
    Full review at: grindhousetheology.blog/2019/08/02/surviving-death-bed-the-bed-that-eats-1977/

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  • Hereditary

    Hereditary

    Director Ari Aster’s new film – with influences such as Japanese ghost stories, Stanley Kubrick’s horror classic The Shining, and 1973’s Don’t Look Now – brings the viewer front and center to an experience when, once the credits roll, leaves you physically tired.

    Hereditary introduces us to the Graham family: Annie (Toni Collette) and Steve (Gabriel Byrne), along with their two children, their son Peter (Alex Wolff) and their daughter Charlie (Milly Shapiro). We are invited into the story right…

  • Split

    Split

    For many of us, mystery is uncomfortable. We hate not having a grip on what to do in a situation. We prefer to label and assign a cause to something because it gives us control and we know “what to do with it.” Instead of taking the time to enter the mess of real understanding, we take the cheap way out and, in the process, often don’t actually help like we think we are but, in fact, make matters worse.…