Favorite films

  • The Rules of the Game
  • Bicycle Thieves
  • Sansho the Bailiff
  • L'Avventura

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  • I Touched Her Legs

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  • Eternity and a Day

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  • Old Joy

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  • Histoire(s) du CinΓ©ma 1b: A Single (Hi)story

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  • Andrei Rublev

    Andrei Rublev

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    The most important thing to know about this movie is that during 1360-1430, "art" did not exist. The Byzantine iconography that Andrei Rublev and his peers then produced, and virtually all paintings the world over, were objects of veneration that could perform miracles. They, as Hans Belting explains in many of his works, gave more meaning to their contexts (church walls and so on) than their contexts gave to them. "The image as social actor", we could say. This foreknowledge…

  • ClΓ©o from 5 to 7

    ClΓ©o from 5 to 7

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    Last year i spent a month living in Place d'Italie w/ my partner so whenever the characters took the bus somewhere we both (she, rewatching for the millionth time, and I for only the second) had minor freakouts recognizing the parks / street names. It's hard to imagine Nouvelle Vague without the expressive visual techniques and labyrinthine subjectivities born and rendered here (in 1962!). Varda's best movies have a life of their own. Watching ClΓ©o, that life, more than half a century later, still burns with undeniable brightness.