IndieWire

IndieWire

HQ

The definitive outlet for film and TV news, reviews, and industry analysis.

Stories

Paramount’s Live-Action ‘Your Name’ Movie Lands ‘Minari’ Director Lee Isaac Chung

While his Sundance sensation “Minari” is still on the hook for release from A24 Films, director Lee Isaac Chung has just landed a major new project with the live-action reimagining of the beloved 2016 Japanese animated fantasy, “Your Name.” Chung will write and direct the film, which will be produced by Bad Robot’s J.J. Abrams and Genki Kawamura, producer on the original film, with Toho handling distribution in Japan and Paramount Pictures releasing in other territories. The news was first reported by Deadline.…

Alfonso Cuarón on ‘Disappointing’ Oscar Inclusion Rules and Supporting a Rising Indian Filmmaker

As a Mexican filmmaker who makes movies with Hollywood money, Alfonso Cuarón is no stranger to conversations about diversity. However, the “Roma” director has mixed feelings about the Academy’s recent inclusion standards for Best Picture, two years after his own movie was nominated in the category. “Everybody is trying to figure out ways of making more diverse cinema,” Cuarón said by phone last week. “The interesting thing is that it’s not coming naturally. Everybody has to respond to outside pressures. That’s a…

Charlie Kaufman’s Guide to ‘I’m Thinking of Ending Things’: The Director Explains Its Mysteries

Charlie Kaufman is not a fan of solving movies for his audience. “I’m not really big on explaining what things are,” the writer-director said in a phone interview. “I let people have their experiences, so I don’t really have expectations about what people are going to think. I really do support anybody’s interpretation.” Nevertheless, nothing in Kaufman’s head-spinning repertoire has begged for answers more than “I’m Thinking of Ending Things.” His scripts for “Being John Malkovich” and “Adaptation” took bizarre labyrinthine…

‘Tenet’ Needs Movie Theaters Even More Than Movie Theaters Need ‘Tenet’

When it comes to a new Christopher Nolan movie, the question of if you should see it has long been supplanted by the question of how you might do that. On the big screen, of course — that much is a given — but which screen, and how big? Will the local multiplex do, or is it worth schlepping to the IMAX across town? Can you settle for digital projection, or is the clarity of 70mm a must? Screening options have become something of a running…

Recent reviews

Fauna

Fauna

★★★

Review by Ryan Lattanzio

Estranged siblings gathering weary forces to check in on their distant parents rarely makes for a good time in real life, but onscreen in Nicolás Pereda’s “Fauna,” it’s a rife setup for awkward moments and cringe comedy refracted through an oddball lens. Dry as a bone and shot with clinical detachment, the latest entry in the evolving Pereda cinematic universe is both a dysfunctional family dramedy and a droll sendup of celebrity obsession, using the global…

No Ordinary Man

No Ordinary Man

★★★★

Review by Jude Dry

As a historically marginalized group, LGBTQ people must excavate the past in order to find evidence of their existence. But when flying under the radar is a means of survival in a society determined to erase you, stories of queer life are often difficult to find. Every once in awhile, a long lost family member is hiding in plain sight — but it is up to us to reach out and claim them as our own.…

Wildfire

Wildfire

★★★

Review by Ryan Lattanzio

The unspoken and often ineffable syzygy between sisters sharing in a mutual trauma is one rife for cinematic inquiry, from the films of Ingmar Bergman to Lars von Trier’s “Melancholia” and even “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” Cathy Brady’s “Wildfire” is set in a fractious Ireland where the gulf between estranged siblings Kelly (Nika McGuigan) and Lauren (Nora-Jane Noone) is as wide and blurry as the void between the North and the South post-Brexit. While…

Review by Kate Erbland

There’s so much to learn about Iranian schoolteacher Sara (Sahar Dolatshahi) in the opening act of Farnoosh Samadi’s feature directorial debut, “180 Degree Rule.” She’s popular, well-regarded by both her fellow teachers and her teenage students, the kind of person who gets things done, a loving mother to her young daughter Raha, and a major part of her boisterous and big family. Her relationship with her uptight husband Hamed (Pejman Jamshidi) is something different, however, and…

Review by Eric Kohn

The very existence of Fletcher Street Stables, where Black cowboys have kept horses in cramped rooms and roamed the city streets for a century, begs for cultural investigation. While the image of the Black cowboy has been marginalized by American storytelling, the real-life characters of Fletcher Street provide an excuse to make up for past exclusions. The setting served as a backdrop for Greg Neri’s novel “Ghetto Cowboy,” which has now inspired “Concrete Cowboy,” a sentimental father-son drama that doesn’t break new ground, but milks the fascinating backdrop for all its formulaic potential and winds up compelling enough.

Wolfwalkers

Wolfwalkers

★★★★

Review by David Ehrlich

Irish animation studio Cartoon Saloon may not be able to match the impact or consistency of Japan’s Studio Ghibli (who can?), but the Kilkenny-based outfit has gradually emerged as one of the world’s last and most valuable bulwarks against the crude and craven soullessness that has defined the post-“Shrek” era of mainstream animated movies. Rooted in Celtic mythology and drawn to look like a moving stained glass window, 2009’s Oscar-nominated “The Secret of Kells” stood apart…

Good Joe Bell

Good Joe Bell

★★★½

Review by Kate Erbland

Early in Reinaldo Marcus Green’s delicate drama “Good Joe Bell,” the eponymous Joe Bell (Mark Wahlberg) — thought not yet “good” enough — makes a promise to his family. “I’m going to try to be better,” the small-town husband and father vows, and such is the theme of this true life story, a wrenching examination of the price of forgiveness, and how even the best of intentions may not ever be enough. While formulaic on its face, Green’s film resists the sort of obvious cinematic catharsis expected of such a story, resulting in a final product that earns its emotional beats.

A softer, wiser, and yet far more action-able sequel to “Stop Making Sense” that resolves into one of the best movies of its kind that anyone has made in the 36 years since.

Read the Review on IndieWire