J. Nye

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  • Return of the Blind Dead

    Return of the Blind Dead

    ★★★

    During a brief period in the 70s Amando de Ossorio was like the Hong Sang-soo of Spanish zombie ghost movies: he kept turning out slight variations of the same plotline which, despite their similarities, are compulsively watchable in their hypnotic, repetitive uneasiness. If this one's not as good as the others it's because it tries to incorporate too many different genres (battle scenes, melodrama, even some dumb horny-mayor gags better left to Mel Brooks), but de Ossorio would fortunately return to his tried-and-true formula of soporific atmosphere and creeping dread in Night of the Seagulls—an effective combo later ripped-off by Herzog in his Nosferatu remake.

  • No Room for the Groom

    No Room for the Groom

    ★★★½

    Sublimated sex comedy that has Tony Curtis unable to consummate his marriage to Piper Laurie (before Twin Peaks but in a town just as ominous) and constantly thwarted by nosy relatives, a bickering mother-in-law, and reluctant devotion to the red, white, and blue balls. I would have enjoyed this more if it had a shred of compassion (nearly every character, including Laurie's for most of the film, is defined merely as an irritating obstacle), but Curtis commits himself amiably, talking…

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  • The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat

    The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat

    ★★★★★

    If any movie deserves a 3-D rerelease, this is it.

  • Intolerance: Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages

    Intolerance: Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages

    ★★★★★

    D.W. Griffith's three-hour fugue of a film deserves its reputation as one of the great silent epics for its Babylon sequence alone—a visual smorgasbord of architecture, bodies, and warfare that, in its excessive yet breathtakingly exquisite detail and labyrinthine textures, strongly anticipates the work of Erich von Stroheim and Josef von Sternberg—yet it also shares certain similarities with Godard's Here and Elsewhere and other structural films of the 1960s and 70s in that it functions as a experiential instructional manual,…