• Gunpowder Milkshake

    Gunpowder Milkshake

    ★★

    Disappointing secret society of hitmen movie. Looks great in stills but the direction isn’t kinetic enough, too much slow-mo hindering any excitement. A fight in a bowling alley and some slapstick flailing in a corridor hint at something better, but it’s dragged down cumbersome directorial choices and forced quirkiness. Cracking cast though.

  • Room 237

    Room 237

    ★★★

    I love humans. Always seeing patterns in things that aren’t there. 

    Fascinating, sometimes hilarious, sometimes sad, exploration of The Shining fan theories and the concept of apophenia. I just felt sorry for the guy who thinks the US government are after him because he worked out the moon landings were faked, and the zoom in to what is very clearly a skiing poster as the voiceover explaining their theory states it’s a Minotaur is laugh out loud.

  • Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

    Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

    ★★★★

    Another Marvel origin but given weight by great casting, performances and choreography, a smattering of homages, a fun script and massive dragons.

  • Vice Academy

    Vice Academy

    ★★★★★

    The thinking man’s Police Academy.

  • Synchronic

    Synchronic

    ★★★★

    What is Cake? Well, it has an active ingredient which is a dangerous psychoactive compound known as dimesmeric andersonphospate. It stimulates the part of the brain called Shatner's Bassoon, and that's the bit of the brain that deals with time perception. So a second feels like a month. Well, it almost sounds like fun, unless you’re the Prague schoolboy who walked out into the street, straight in front of a tram. He thought he’d got a month to cross the street.

  • Bill & Ted Face the Music

    Bill & Ted Face the Music

    ★★★

    Not laugh out loud funny but good, wholesome fun. A legacy sequel that seems natural in its narrative and the best use of a remorseful killer robot you’ll ever see.

  • Superbad

    Superbad

    ★★★★

    Although some parts may have dated, this surprisingly sweet coming-of-age comedy still provides many laugh-out-loud moments, held up by the foul-mouthed Hill, naive Cera and idiotic Mintz-Plasse. The bittersweet ending still gets me, as Seth and Evan part ways on their journey to adulthood.

  • Barb & Star Go to Vista Del Mar

    Barb & Star Go to Vista Del Mar

    ★★★★

    Very silly, bright and uplifting mix of Austin Powers and Shirley Valentine. While some of the jokes in the second half are a bit obvious and don’t all land, it’s carried by the strength of Mumolo and Wiig as Barb and Star respectively, with a stand out turn from Jamie Dornan, with all three looking like they’re having a blast.

  • Tom & Jerry

    Tom & Jerry

    Look, I like Rob Delaney and Ken Jeong and some of the slapstick is taken from the original Tom & Jerry cartoons and at least it doesn’t try to smash together a load of Warner Bros IP’s but the majority of this is just balls.

  • The New Mutants

    The New Mutants

    ★★

    Not utterly terrible like Apocalypse or Dark Phoenix but certainly not a good film. It feels like a cross between the 90’s Generation X TV movie (where it was too expensive to show any powers) and Fant4stic in that it’s clearly been absolutely pulled to pieces by meddling and probably the Disney buyout too which definitely mucked up the Essex Corp/Mr Sinister stuff.

  • Candyman

    Candyman

    ★★★★½

    Almost perfect legacy sequel/companion piece to the original. I say almost perfect because, as a film, I don’t think it’s got quite the haunting atmosphere of the first. As an idea though, this is an important film: justifiably angry minority voices telling their stories, creating a film that is almost a meta commentary, weaving the story of its precursor with real world events and creating something that provokes important thinking and listening.

  • Bram Stoker's Legend of the Mummy

    Bram Stoker's Legend of the Mummy

    If you are a fan of cats, mummies and actors from Hone Improvement who aren’t Tim Allen, then this is the film for you.