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  • The King of Staten Island

    The King of Staten Island

    ★★★½

    There's a darkness in Pete Davidson's comedy that seems straight from r/dankmemes. Scott jokes about his dad dying (a lot). He jokes about suicide and self harm (a lot). He's self-deprecating to the point where it's a cry for help.

    Davidson brings an edge to an Apatow film that we don't normally see. Yes, once again, we have the stunted man-child smoking weed, and seriously needing personal growth. But never before has the protagonist needed a mentor, needed a some…

  • Eighth Grade

    Eighth Grade

    ★★★★★

    Fuck it, five stars. This movie made me feel like the Grinch when his heart grew three sizes.

    It’s not, in any sense, a suspense movie. But, such was my compassion for Kayla, that I was on the edge of my seat when she’d put herself out there. Burnham makes all the small social interactions feel MAJOR.

    The only criticism I have is that the secondary characters are all a bit one note. But the depth of Kayla, and the brilliance of Elsie Fischer’s performance (I detect hardly any acting, so comfortable on screen) carried me through.

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  • The Butler

    The Butler

    ★★★

    The Butler is a Forrest Gump-like fly-over of 20th century American history. Trying to tell two stories at once, we get the tale of a poorer than dirt kid who became a white house butler for thirty years, and also, the entire chronicle of American civil rights. Forrest Gump did not explore American problems; instead it milked humour from the protagonist’s obliviousness. The Butler, conversely, dives into America’s muck. The protagonist Cecil Gaines is starkly aware of, and victimized by,…

  • The World's End

    The World's End

    ★★★½

    If nothing else, The Cornetto Trilogy is a labour of love. Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg, and Nick Frost obviously have a blast making these films, but what makes them so satisfying is the level of effort and detail put into producing and scripting. In The World's End, Edgar Wright carefully plans shots early in the film that will be repeated later, taking on new meanings when they do (e.g. watching the sunset on the hill, or five guys walking down…